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Author Interviews
6:30 am
Sat July 27, 2013

What If The X-Men Were Real? Q&A With Marcus Sakey, Author Of 'Brilliance'

What if the X-Men were real? And what if they weren't mutants in spandex, but people like you and me and Bob in accounting, just endowed with superhuman talents for things like pattern recognition, programming and strategy?

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Dance
6:28 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Preserving Balanchine's Ballet Legacy, 30 Years Later

Dancers perform George Balanchine's Serenade in a 2007 production staged by Francia Russell and Suzanne Schorer at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.
Maxim Marmur AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

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News
6:16 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Public Opinion May Give Russia An Edge In Snowden Case

Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena is representing NSA contractor Edward Snowden, said Russia has three months to consider his request for temporary asylum.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 8:25 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin keeps insisting that he doesn't want the case of a fugitive American intelligence contractor to harm relations between Russia and the United States.

But Edward Snowden remains an irritant, stuck in diplomatic limbo in the transit area of a Moscow airport.

A Putin spokesman said Friday that the issue is being discussed by the Russian federal security service — the FSB — and the FBI, but it may be that Snowden has become a problem that can only be solved at the top of the two governments.

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Parallels
5:48 am
Sat July 27, 2013

When It Comes To Extraditions, Russia Often Cooperates

Russian supporters of NSA leaker Edward Snowden rally in central Moscow on July 12. Russia says it won't extradite Snowden to the United States, but it has cooperated with other countries in the past.
Evgeny Feldman AFP/Getty Images

Russia so far has refused to extradite former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, portraying this as a principled stand to protect a whistle-blower.

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News
5:47 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Emergency Summit On Urban Violence Opens In Chicago

A sidewalk memorial in Chicago remembers Eugene Clark, 25, who was shot and killed last weekend. In the same weekend, the city had at least 6 people killed and 22 wounded by gunfire. This weekend, the Congressional Black Caucus held a summit in Chicago to discuss violence in urban areas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Rep. Robin Kelly, one of the hosts of the urban violence summit in Chicago, said at the outset Friday that this wouldn't be just another summit.

"Maybe just some of you are tired of having your leaders hold summits that are long on talk and short on action," she told attendees. "Today's summit aims to be different."

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Food
5:46 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Pie-Deprived New Orleans Roots For Bakery, A Year After Fire

Jill Pasquarella (right) pours powdered sugar on Brandon Connelly, who dressed as a baker from Hubig's Pies, during Mardi Gras in New Orleans in February.
Chris Granger The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:59 pm

Almost any kind of comeback gets New Orleans excited, since the city lost so much in the flood after Hurricane Katrina. That goes especially for food.

One year ago Saturday, New Orleans lost a beloved brand when Hubig's pie bakery burned to the ground. The hand-held, fruit-filled crescents, fried golden-brown, had been delivered fresh to more than 1,000 local stores each morning.

Pie fans have come out in droves to support the company. But it takes more than T-shirts and fond memories to restart a business from scratch.

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Shots - Health News
7:07 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

50 Years On, Research On Sex Can Still Be A Lightning Rod

Johnson with her fellow researcher and sometimes husband, William Masters. The pair helped legitimize the study of human sexuality.
AP

The world has changed a lot since a divorced mother of two teamed up with a St. Louis gynecologist to study the physiology of sex.

Masters and Johnson's first book, Human Sexual Response, made Virginia Johnson and William Masters household names in the 1960s. More than any other scientists before them, they approached sex as a biological process to be observed, measured and analyzed.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:01 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Not My Job: Jim Gaffigan Takes A Quiz On Gwyneth Paltrow

Mark Mainz Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:41 am

Comedian and actor Jim Gaffigan lives happily with his wife and his five young children in a two-bedroom apartment in lower Manhattan. You read that right: Five kids. Two parents. Two bedrooms. His latest book, Dad Is Fat, reflects on the challenges and triumphs of raising a big family in a small space.

We've invited Gaffigan to answer three questions about the health habits of Gwyneth Paltrow.

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Found Recipes
5:57 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

And The Winning Taste Of Summer Is ...

Some NPR staff members taste recipes from the contest finalists.
Matt Martinez NPR

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

The voting is finished. The taste test is done. The verdict is in: Marti Olesen has won All Things Considered's Taste of Summer contest with her recipe for Diane's Dad's Summer Sandwich.

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Law
5:55 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

After Five Years, Why So Few Charges In Financial Crisis?

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress about the program in 2010. Barofsky now says of the financial crisis: "The folks responsible for this incredibly painful economic damage that struck our economy have gone free."
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:01 pm

In the latest in a string of insider trading cases, federal prosecutors this week indicted SAC Capital, one of the most prominent and profitable hedge funds in the world.

But when it comes to the 2008 financial crisis that sent the economy into a tailspin, criminal prosecutions have been few and far between.

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