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Around the Nation
6:10 am
Wed May 28, 2014

No Matter How You Spell It, Fracking Stirs Controversy

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 12:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. The word fracking was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary this month. It is defined as the injection of fluid into shale beds at high pressure in order to free up petroleum resources. Despite getting this official definition, both the spelling and meaning of fracking remain controversial. Marie Cusick, from member station WITF, reports.

MARIE CUSICK, BYLINE: This is a fracking site in northeastern Pennsylvania. It's one of the most productive parts of Marcellus Shale natural gas formation.

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Africa
5:07 am
Wed May 28, 2014

U.N. Peacekeepers In South Sudan Told To Protect Civilians

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

The Security Council has voted to change the United Nation's role in South Sudan from nation building to civilian protection. Thousands of civilians have been killed in months of ethnic fighting.

Afghanistan
5:06 am
Wed May 28, 2014

U.S. Plans To Leave Residual Force Of Nearly 10,000 In Afghanistan

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene. Today, President Obama outlined his vision for the nation's foreign policy in a commencement address at West Point. He set the table for that speech with remarks at the White House yesterday, speaking about a country that has been central to U.S. foreign-policy - Afghanistan. The President sketched out his plan to draw down U.S. troops there after more than a decade of war. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Malaysia Makes Public Satellite Data From Missing Jetliner

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene. It has been almost three months now since a Malaysian Airlines jet disappeared with 239 people on board. Satellite data led authorities to conclude the plane flew for hours and then went down somewhere off the coast of Australia. Yesterday, investigators made that data public for the first time. And joining us in our studio to discuss this is NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel. Geoff, welcome.

GEOFF BRUMFIEL, BYLINE: Hi.

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Obama To Use West Point Speech To Lay Out Foreign Policy Doctrine

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene. President Obama delivers the commencement address at West Point today. Aides say he'll lay out a broad vision for foreign policy and America's role in the world. Among the foreign policy challenges facing the president of late, Russia's annexation of Crimea and China's provocative moves in Asia. The president will try to describe a coherent approach to those challenges. But as NPR's Scott Horsley reports, this might not be an out-right Obama doctrine.

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NPR Story
5:01 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Designer Of New York City Subway Map Dies

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Sweetness And Light
3:36 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Don't Overlook The Unsung Umpire; Referees Can Be Pretty, Too

Referee Mendy Rudolph officiates a Knicks-Pistons game in 1971. Refs often say it's best to go unnoticed, but an official who "makes a call with vigor and elan is really a beautiful part of the game," says Frank Deford.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Not so long ago, while enjoying a libation in a decorous saloon, the proprietor — who happened to hail from the fabled Windy City — suddenly jarred the genteel assembled by turning on the Cubs game. Just at that moment, a Cubby was heading toward the plate when the throw came in, and the runner (spoiler alert!), being a Cub, was tagged out.

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Law
3:35 am
Wed May 28, 2014

After Private Pilots Complain, Customs Rethinks Intercept Policy

Tom and Bonnie Lewis were stopped on a trip from Texas to New Hampshire because they were flying along a known drug air route.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

Federal border security agents have sharply reduced intercepts of general aviation aircraft, following complaints by pilots that excessive police action at small airports is restricting the freedom to fly.

An official with U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Office of Air and Marine Operations told NPR his agency has heard pilots' grievances and the program is being altered so as not to needlessly affront law-abiding pilots.

In recent years, more and more pilots have reported their aircraft stopped for warrantless searches by aggressive officers.

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Around the Nation
3:33 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Industrial Hemp Could Take Root, If Legal Seeds Weren't So Scarce

The hemp seedlings in Ben Holmes' warehouse in Lafayette, Colo., will be ready for harvest in about 50 days. Holmes says that during the peak growing season, the little sprouts can shoot up several inches each day.
Luke Runyon KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:57 pm

The most recent farm bill is allowing a handful of farmers across the country to put hemp, the nonpsychoactive cousin of marijuana, in the ground.

The bill allows small-scale experimentation with the plant. But despite the new law, many farmers say they're getting mixed messages from the federal government.

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The Salt
3:30 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif.
Tim Hussin for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 11:27 am

In the world of cheese, much like in the world of wine, the ultimate mark of success is acceptance by the French. That's exactly what happened to Sue Conley and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery in northern California.

In 2010, when they were inducted into the prestigious Guilde des Fromagers, they were among the first wave of American cheesemakers to join its ranks.

Cowgirl Creamery also put out its first cookbook in late 2013.

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