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5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

It's A New Orleans Mantra, But Using 'Who Dat' May Cost You

The phrase "Who Dat" is ubiquitous in New Orleans. A Texas-based company says it owns the rights to the phrase, and while homemade signs don't run afoul of its trademark, it says merchandise like T-shirts is another matter.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:46 pm

During pro football season, New Orleans becomes " 'Who Dat' Nation." Fans open New Orleans Saints games with the signature chant and use it to rattle the eardrums of opponents during play.

Since the Saints' Super Bowl win in 2010, the phrase has popped up everywhere, from T-shirts to business names. Even people who don't watch football call themselves "Who Dats." But a messy legal question keeps rearing its head here: Who owns "Who Dat"?

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All Tech Considered
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Share And Share Alike: A Time Of Collaborative Consumption

Renting out your couches — or your entire place — is powered by San Francisco–based Airbnb, which has now connected more than half a million willing hosts and travelers in more than 34,000 cities.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:17 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog, aggregated here and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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Science
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:13 pm

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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Africa
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

DRC Rebels' Surrender Could Mark New Chapter In U.N. Peacekeeping

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

There's been a rare bit of good news in Eastern Congo this month. One of the rebel groups that have terrorized civilians in the mineral rich part of the the Democratic Republic of Congo agreed to end its rebellion. There's still a lot of work to do to disarm the M23 and to keep other rebel movements in check. But this small victory is a boost for U.N. peacekeepers, who are under a new, tougher mandate to protect civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some experts wonder if this could be a new model for peacekeeping.

Middle East
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Was On The Table And What Got Rejected At Iran Nuclear Talks?

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 8:21 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The differences between Iran and the six world powers it's negotiating with over its nuclear program remain big enough to have prevented an agreement from being signed in Geneva over the weekend. And the differences between the so-called Five Plus One Group and Israel are also significant. The Five Plus One are the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, that includes the U.S. plus Germany.

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Africa
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Think L.A. Is Bad? Take A Drive Through Traffic-Clogged Lagos

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For another kind of gridlock, we turn now to Nigeria. The city of Lagos is on the fast track to being the most populous in Africa, but the city is often stuck in traffic. Buses, taxis and overloaded trucks are held hostage to a road network that hasn't been updated in decades. The locals call them go-slows. Reporter Rowan Moore Gerety rode along with a Lagos cab driver to see for himself.

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Asia
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In Typhoon-Heavy Western Pacific, Preparation Can Only Go So Far

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As we mentioned earlier, the Philippines is no stranger to big storms. When it comes to typhoons, it's much like Tornado Alley in the American Midwest. Over the past 60 years, the region has seen an average of almost 20 typhoons a year.

As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports, the country is nonetheless hard-pressed to prepare for something as big as this.

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Asia
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Meet Needs After Typhoon In Philippines

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From Manila in the north, now to Cebu in the hard-hit central Philippines. We're going to hear about the aid situation there. Earlier we reached Aaron Aspi. He's with World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization, and Aspi described mass devastation, especially in the northernmost part of the island.

AARON ASPI: Ninety percent of the structures have been damaged and whole communities are obliterated by storm surges with giant waves as high as seven meters.

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Asia
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Devastation, Looting In The Philippines After Deadly Typhoon

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour in the Philippines, where thousands of people are feared dead in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. In the city of Tacloban, utter devastation; cars tossed, the bodies of the dead yet to be buried and survivors clamoring for food and water.

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Parallels
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Will The French Really Pay More for 'Made in France'?

French Minister for Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg attends the Made in France fair in Paris on Saturday. According to a poll, more than 70 percent of the French say they would pay more for goods made at home.
Alain Jocard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

The French economy suffers from many ailments: weak growth, high unemployment, poor competitiveness and a general sense of economic gloom. And every proposed government remedy seems to be met by protests from one corner or another.

Yet no one seems to be arguing with a little injection of economic patriotism.

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