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Shots - Health News
6:17 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

First Estimate On Insurance Sign-Ups Is Pretty Darned Small

Mario Ricart , an insurance agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, talks with Naylie Villa about buying insurance under the Affordable Care Act on Nov. 5 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:53 am

The Obama administration later this week will issue much anticipated enrollment numbers for the first month of the Affordable Care Act.

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Shots - Health News
6:00 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Aid Groups Struggle To Reach Survivors Of Typhoon Haiyan

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:08 am

Aid agencies are scrambling to try to get water and food to people in the Philippines who've been left homeless or injured by Typhoon Haiyan.

But reaching some of the areas ravaged by the intense storm is proving difficult. Even when aid can make it onto the islands, it's still not clear what supplies are needed the most.

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All Tech Considered
5:29 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Today's Online Sharing Companies Can Learn From Napster

Napster founder Shawn Fanning in February 2001, after a ruling that the free Internet-based service must stop allowing copyrighted material to be shared.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 9:02 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog and aggregated at this link, and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Atlanta Braves Shock Fans With Plan To Move To Suburbs

Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves. Monday, the team announced that it will leave Turner Field and move into a new stadium outside the city.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:21 pm

In a move that took many fans by surprise, the Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the team will move to the city's suburbs, where it will build a new stadium. The team's lease on Turner Field, the Braves' home since 1997, will expire in 2016.

The new stadium will be located "just outside Atlanta's city limits," reports Atlanta Daily World.

Georgia Public Broadcasting's Jane Hammond reports:

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Code Switch
5:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In California, A High School That Cheers A-R-A-B-S

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The Coachella Valley High School mascot gives the thumbs up at a 2010 football game. Image courtesy of MyDesert.com.
Jay Calderon Courtesy of The Desert Sun

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Last week, Coachella Valley High School came under fire for the name of its mascot — the Arab. The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee sent a letter to the school, complaining about the way the mascot depicts people of Arab descent. The complaint made the school national news.

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Business
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Race For Same-Day Delivery Could Be Boon For Cash-Strapped USPS

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

While large-scale government IT contracts have a terrible track record, Amazon is a company that has made its reputation for delivering on time. And it's always looking for more ways to shorten the time between online ordering and delivery. Well, today, Amazon announced it's partnering with U.S. Postal Service to expand Sunday delivery options.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports that for the financially strapped Postal Service it's an opportunity to take a bigger role in the lucrative online retailing market.

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Business
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

It's A New Orleans Mantra, But Using 'Who Dat' May Cost You

The phrase "Who Dat" is ubiquitous in New Orleans. A Texas-based company says it owns the rights to the phrase, and while homemade signs don't run afoul of its trademark, it says merchandise like T-shirts is another matter.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:46 pm

During pro football season, New Orleans becomes " 'Who Dat' Nation." Fans open New Orleans Saints games with the signature chant and use it to rattle the eardrums of opponents during play.

Since the Saints' Super Bowl win in 2010, the phrase has popped up everywhere, from T-shirts to business names. Even people who don't watch football call themselves "Who Dats." But a messy legal question keeps rearing its head here: Who owns "Who Dat"?

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All Tech Considered
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Share And Share Alike: A Time Of Collaborative Consumption

Renting out your couches — or your entire place — is powered by San Francisco–based Airbnb, which has now connected more than half a million willing hosts and travelers in more than 34,000 cities.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:17 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog, aggregated here and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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Science
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:13 pm

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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Africa
5:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

DRC Rebels' Surrender Could Mark New Chapter In U.N. Peacekeeping

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

There's been a rare bit of good news in Eastern Congo this month. One of the rebel groups that have terrorized civilians in the mineral rich part of the the Democratic Republic of Congo agreed to end its rebellion. There's still a lot of work to do to disarm the M23 and to keep other rebel movements in check. But this small victory is a boost for U.N. peacekeepers, who are under a new, tougher mandate to protect civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some experts wonder if this could be a new model for peacekeeping.

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