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Economy
6:59 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Thousands Fall From Middle Class After RV Industry Collapse

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We're going to take a close look, now, at the human cost when an industry shuts down. Oregon has kept detailed records on what happened to thousands of people who lost their jobs when the state's RV manufacturing industry imploded during the recession. Since then, many workers dropped from middle wage to low wage earners, a trend playing out across the United States. Some fared even worse. NPR's Kelly McEvers when to Oregon to meet the people behind the numbers.

BRADLEY WARING: Entering Junction City, 5,460 people.

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Repairs Done, Astronauts Wrap Up Spacewalk

Astronaut Mike Hopkins during Saturday's spacewalk. He's going out again Tuesday.
NASA.gov

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 4:12 pm

Spacewalking astronauts have successfully replaced a failed coolant pump on the International Space Station.

NPR's Joe Palca reports that American spacewalkers Michael Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio had to bolt the massive pump in place (on the ground, it weighs 780 pounds), connect four ammonia lines and plug in five electrical cables. The ammonia is a refrigerant used in the station's two-part cooling system, which is necessary to dissipate heat from the onboard electrical equipment.

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Business
5:34 am
Tue December 24, 2013

How Paternity Leave For New Dads Benefit Women

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Something caught our eye in the current issue of The Atlantic. Liza Mundy writes this: Paternity leave makes men more involved at home, women more involved at work, and workplaces friendlier for all parents. It turns out the stigma associated with men who take extended leave when a baby is born is disappearing in some places.

And Liza Mundy, thanks for coming on the program. We appreciate the time.

LIZA MUNDY: Oh, it's great to be here. Thank you.

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Business
5:30 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Target's Troubles Mount After Payment Data Breach

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a legal bullseye on Target.

OK. More than a dozen customers have now filed lawsuits against the retail giant. This is after Target's security was breached and information from nearly 40 million credit and debit cards were stolen.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports that the company is in full defense mode.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Target has offered credit monitoring to its consumers. It's taken to every social medium to get out its story. That's while the first lawsuits have begun to poor in.

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Asia
5:28 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Japan Revisits Its Official Pacifist Policy

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On the morning of Christmas Eve, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

One legacy of World War II is found in Japan's constitution. It bans that country from having a military force. But now Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has proposed a tough new national security strategy which is raising some questions about Japan's intentions.

Tamzin Booth, the Tokyo bureau chief for The Economist, explained to us what's behind the new plan.

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Sports
5:22 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Berlin Cheers On Former East German Soccer Team

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For people in Germany, Christmas means evergreens, "Silent Night" and mulled wine. In the city of Berlin, Christmas also means celebrating a scrappy group of athletes. The FC Union soccer team was formed by iron workers more than a century ago. During the Cold War, it became a symbol of resistance against the East German government. These days, despite mixed results on the field, FC Union remains a fan favorite.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson sent this postcard from a game over the weekend.

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Africa
5:18 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Power Struggle Fuels Violence In South Sudan

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Later today, the United Nations Security Council is expected to vote on sending thousands more peacekeeping troops to South Sudan. This is a country that the United States helped form in 2011.

And now a power struggle between the president and his former vice president has spiraled into violence along tribal lines. Hundreds of people have died and tens of thousands are displaced.

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Remembrances
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Alan Turing, Who Cracked War Code, Receives Posthumous Pardon

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The British government has issued a posthumous pardon for a man who helped win World War II for the allies. Alan Turing was a pioneering computer scientist and code breaker who helped crack Nazi Germany's enigma machine. He worked at Britain's legendary military intelligence headquarters at Bletchley Park.

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NPR Story
5:16 am
Tue December 24, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Climate Change?

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 7:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And in these last days of 2013 we've been having conversations about the future. Rather than grand predictions, we've been seeking a realistic assessment of what lies ahead. So far we've explored cybersecurity, we've looked at the changing electorate. When it comes to climate change, the topic for today, Andrew Steer of the World Resources Institute told my colleague Steve Inskeep that the trends don't look very good.

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