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7:03 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Surprising And Skillful, 'Yellow Dog' Deserves A Second Look

I came to Amis late. I wasn't born when he published his most esteemed book, Money, and I was a 4-year-old with no great passion for Holocaust novels when Time's Arrow was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Amis has always divided critics (all writers worth their salt do), and by the time I read him in the late-noughties the naysayers were beginning to form a grumbling consensus. I quickly found that loving Amis meant having to fight his corner.

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Author Interviews
5:25 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Satan's Naked Women, Gatsby's Cocktails, And Other Literary Fetes

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

Throwing a perfect holiday party is no simple task. Do you want a swanky cocktail party, an intimate dinner party, or a huge New Year's bash? A whole host of decisions revolve around the menu — and don't forget your gluten-free or vegan invitees. Then there's the decor (is tinsel too much?), the music (festive, but not cheesy) and, of course, the guest list.

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It's All Politics
5:25 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Another Partisan Divide: Mitt Romney's Looks

Mitt Romney speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on March 15. New research suggests Democrats and Republicans had different perceptions of his physical appearance during the 2012 election.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

It's clear that Republicans and Democrats had different political opinions about Mitt Romney. But did Romney literally look different to the two sides? A forthcoming study suggests that might be the case.

According to new research from Ohio State University psychologists, individual political biases might have caused 2012 GOP presidential nominee's physical appearance to appear different to Republicans and Democrats.

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Music News
5:24 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Meet Latin America's Teenage Korean Pop Fanatics

The room of Samantha Alejandra, 18, in Mexico City, doubles as a shrine to her favorite K-Pop boy band, Super Junior.
Marlon Bishop for NPR

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 11:27 am

If you want to get a sense of what Mexican teenagers are up to these days, here's an unexpected place to start: A Korean bakery in downtown Mexico City.

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Around the Nation
5:23 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Oh My, Ohio! Five States Named 'Most Likely To Curse'

A rudeness ranking puts Ohio at the top of the list for "Most Likely To Curse," while South Carolina rates as the "Most Courteous" state.
Courtesy of Marchex

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 1:05 pm

Most of us like to think we comport ourselves with a certain level of civility. But apparently, phone calls with customer service representatives of all stripes can lead us into more colorful speech. And some people like to track it.

"There's just something about big data and sailor-cursing that complement each other — like peanut butter and mothereffing jelly," writes Megan Garber of The Atlantic.

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The Two-Way
1:52 am
Sun December 15, 2013

As The World Watches, Mandela Is Buried In His Humble Village

Large video screens were set up around the village of Qunu for the more than 4,000 mourners who gathered for the service.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 7:09 pm

Updated at 6:22 a.m. ET

Under a sunny African sky, Nelson Mandela was buried Sunday on a hill overlooking his beloved boyhood village. Members of his clan, national leaders and a global audience bid farewell to the man who transformed his country and became one of the world's most revered figures.

The burial marked the culmination of 10 days of mourning and tributes to Mandela's remarkable journey, which began and ended in Qunu. Home to a few hundred farmers, the village is little-changed since Mandela's childhood.

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Hanukkah Lights: Stories of the Season
11:13 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Hanukkah Lights 2013

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:40 am

Celebrate the Jewish holiday with Hanukkah Lights — selected stories commissioned by NPR. In this edition, a young boy learns that bigger and brighter things are not necessarily better; a lonely and alienated immigrant finds hope for the future while searching for potatoes to use in her family's Hanukkah latkes; an aging couple exchange awkwardly ironic Hanukkah presents; two men engage in a lively discussion over the traditions of the menorah and discover the healing power of an argument; and a precious gift leads to the reunion of old friends and a reconciliation of ancient cultures.

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The Two-Way
9:05 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Florida State QB Jameis Winston Wins Heisman Trophy

Florida State University quarterback Jameis Winston won the 2013 Heisman Trophy as college football's best player. He's shown here in a Nov. 2 game against Miami.
Mike Ehrmann Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 14, 2013 9:17 pm

Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, the nation's top-rated passer who led his team to college football's title game in his first season, was named the 2013 Heisman Trophy winner Saturday as the country's best collegiate player.

Winston, 19, became the youngest player and second straight redshirt freshman to win the award, following Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel.

Winston completed nearly 68 percent of his passes for 3,820 yards, 38 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. Undefeated Florida State plays Auburn in the Jan. 6 Bowl Championship Series title game.

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World
7:21 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Snow Chills Syrian Refugees As U.S. Suspends Aid To Rebels

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
5:50 pm
Sat December 14, 2013

Before The Prescription, Ask About Your Doctor's Finances

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 8:45 am

Last month, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology issued new guidelines that could double the number of people taking cholesterol-lowering drugs.

The organizations receive financial support from drug companies, and many of the experts who worked on the guidelines have industry ties.

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