NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
7:53 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Death Toll Rises To 120 In Israeli Airstrikes On Gaza

A Palestinian boy sits on the rubble of Al-Farouk mosque, which police said was destroyed in an Israeli airstrike, in Nuseirat in the central Gaza Strip on Saturday.
Ezz Zanoon/APA Images APA/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 12:19 pm

At least 120 people in the Gaza Strip have been killed in Israeli airstrikes as both sides exchange fire across the tense border. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports that Israeli tanks and reserve troops are poised for a possible ground invasion.

Israel launched a campaign five days ago to halt the relentless Hamas rocket attacks on its citizens. The Associated Press says: "While there have been no fatalities in Israel, Gaza Health Ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Kidra said overnight attacks raised the death toll there to over 120, with more than 920 wounded."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:43 am
Sat July 12, 2014

The Moon Puts On A Triple Super Summer Spectacle

The moon appeared bigger and brighter when it went supermoon on June 23, 2013 — especially when it was seen next to objects on the horizon, such as the helicopter from the original Batman television show at the New Jersey State Fair last year.
Julio Cortez AP

Summer 2014 promises to be more super than most, and not just because of the World Cup or LeBron James returning to Cleveland.

This summer, the moon will reach "super" status not once, not twice, but three times — and the first time happens Saturday night.

Read more
Around the Nation
7:39 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Governors Talk Infrastructure At Annual Meeting

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:18 am

The National Governors Association held its annual summer meeting in Nashville, Tenn. this week, and the collapsing highway trust fund was the centerpiece issue.

Politics
7:39 am
Sat July 12, 2014

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Campaign spending in the Kentucky Senate race between GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell and Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes could reach $100 million.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:34 am

For the amount of money that's expected to be spent in the Kentucky race for U.S. Senate this year, you could buy a bottle of the state's own Maker's Mark whiskey for nearly every man, woman and child in the state.

Some observers say the election could end up as the most expensive Senate race in history, with spending topping $100 million. And why wouldn't it be? It's at the heart of the battle for control of the U.S. Senate.

Read more
Music Games & Humor
7:39 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Tracking The World's Famous Most Unread Books

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 10:18 am

NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Jordan Ellenberg about his part-serious, part-playful Hawking Index, which is an e-book-era mathematical measurement of how far readers get into books before giving up.

Asia
7:39 am
Sat July 12, 2014

The Day That Changed Everything On Mt. Everest

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:50 am

On April 18, 16 Nepalese guides were killed in an avalanche on Mt. Everest. NPR's Tamara Keith talks to Outside Magazine's Grayson Schaffer about the deadliest day in Everest history.

Sports
7:39 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Rio's Statue Is Restored, But Brazil Team's Redemption Still Ahead

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:57 am

Restoration work on Rio's famed "Christ the Redeemer" statue is now complete. But can Brazil get redemption after not making it to the World Cup finals?

Music Interviews
7:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Jack Antonoff Takes A Break From fun. To Release 'Desire'

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:58 am

Jack Antonoff, lead guitarist for the band fun., wanted to break out on his own. Now he has — with his new band, Bleachers. NPR's Tamara Keith talks to him about the debut album, Strange Desire.

Author Interviews
7:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

'Angels' Find Pre-Civil War Home In Idyllic Interracial Enclave

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:42 am

NPR's Tamara Keith talks to Breena Clark about her new novel, Angels Make Their Hope Here. It follows Dossie Bird, a girl who escapes slavery in 1849 and flees to a refuge in New Jersey.

Movie Interviews
7:38 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Ellar Coltrane Speaks Of Growing Up On Screen In 'Boyhood'

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 11:45 am

Film director Richard Linklater's latest movie, Boyhood, was shot over 12 years. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks with the star of the film, Ellar Coltrane, who spent over a decade shooting the movie.

Pages