The Salt
3:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Farm Laborers Get A Foothold With Their Own Organic Farms

Agricultural work, which is physically demanding, is also a risky business venture.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:01 pm

Northern California's Salinas Valley is often dubbed America's salad bowl. Large growers there have long relied on thousands of seasonal workers from rural Mexico to pick lettuce, spinach and celery from sunrise to sunset. Many of these workers seem destined for a life in the fields. But a program that helps field workers, like Raul Murillo, start their own farms and businesses is starting to yield a few success stories.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Buttermilk Makes Everything Taste A Little Better

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:55 pm

It started happening about 15 years ago. I'd be paging through a new cookbook or browsing through recipes online, and I'd suddenly stop. "Mmm, buttermilk biscuits. Doesn't that sound good?" I'd bookmark the site or dog-ear the page. The next week I'd see a recipe for waffles — buttermilk waffles, as it happened. What a splendid idea. Out came the yellow stickies.

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Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

What's New In Charlotte Food: Restaurant Critics

Popular Asheville eatery Tupelo Honey Cafe is opening a location at the old Pewter Rose spot in Charlotte's South End.
Credit jenlrile / flickr

The dog days of summer are upon us so maybe it's time to switch up your routine with a new food find around town. We gather our regular panel of Charlotte food writers and critics to fill us in on the latest and greatest in chowing down and dining out around the Queen City. What's new, what's closing, who has the best outdoor patios, the best summer cocktails, best barbecue and are things looking up for Charlotte eateries as we crawl out of the recession? We'll tackle those topics, the latest food trends and changes at some of the city's favorite eateries and more, all when Charlotte Talks. List of restaurants mentioned on today's show. 

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Code Switch
7:08 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Harry Belafonte, Jay Z And Intergenerational Beef

Beyonce (left) and Jay Z arrive at a "Justice for Trayvon" rally in New York earlier this month.
Mary Altaffer AP

Hip-hop beefs don't burn any slower or get any more bizarre.

Last year, Harry Belafonte, the acclaimed singer, actor and civil rights activist, was awkwardly quoted by a foreign reporter in a Q&A about modern celebrity and social responsibility. The always-outspoken Belafonte didn't really hold back.

Q: Are you happy with the image of members of minorities in Hollywood today?

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It's All Politics
6:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Immigration Issue Shows Big Money Doesn't Always Win In D.C.

The crowd cheers speaker Glenn Beck (not pictured) during a Tea Party rally to "Audit the IRS" in front of the U.S. Capitol on June 19.
Gary Cameron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:17 pm

Big Money often gets what it wants in Washington. But not always.

In few policy debates is that more true than in the proposed overhaul of the nation's immigration laws.

The big donors and corporate leaders of the Republican establishment mostly favor remaking U.S. immigration laws to give those now here illegally an eventual door to citizenship and to increase the annual quota for guest workers.

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It's All Politics
5:52 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

GOP Puzzles Over Liz Cheney Senate Run

Liz Cheney during a 2010 appearance on the CBS news program Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:40 pm

Liz Cheney's decision to move to deep red Wyoming and launch what promises to be an expensive primary challenge against GOP Sen. Mike Enzi continues to baffle.

And it's not just pollsters — whose early surveys show her trailing the popular Enzi badly in a state where an overwhelming majority of voters say they don't view her as a "Wyomingite" — who are scratching their heads.

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The Salt
5:52 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite Legal Blow, New York To Keep Up Sugary Drink Fight

On Tuesday, a state appeals court called New York City's ban on supersized soda unconstitutional.
Allison Joyce Getty Images News

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:01 pm

A state appeals court on Tuesday rejected New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of sugary beverages sold in his city. But in a statement, Bloomberg and the city's top lawyer, Michael Cardozo, called the decision a "temporary setback" and vowed to appeal.

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Shots - Health News
5:45 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:08 pm

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

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Law
5:35 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Citing Supreme Court, Judge Awards Benefits To Same-Sex Widow

Another barrier to recognition of same-sex marriage appears to have fallen. On Monday a federal judge ordered a law firm to pay survivor's benefits to the widow in a same-sex marriage, and on Tuesday the law firm said it was happy to comply and would not appeal.

The decision is the latest in a series of court rulings equalizing benefits for legally married same-sex couples in the aftermath of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

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Music
5:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973

British rockers Led Zeppelin pose in front of their private plane, dubbed "The Starship," in 1973.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:58 am

Author Michael Walker says that by the end of the 1960s, you could fairly say there were two generations of baby boomers: those who had experienced that decade's peace-and-love era of music firsthand, and those who learned about it from their older brothers and sisters.

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