Sunday Headlines
9:35 am
Sun August 18, 2013

N.C. Files More Suits Over Coal-Ash Runoff

The state of North Carolina has filed more lawsuits against Duke Energy seeking to force the utility to clean up water pollution from coal ash at 12 power plants. The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources filed two lawsuits Friday in Wake and Mecklenburg counties. Those suits expand the state's litigation to all 14 of North Carolina's coal-fired plants.  Water tests at the 12 sites covered in the new suits showed chemical levels above what’s considered safe. State inspectors also have seen seeping liquid that’s not allowed under Duke’s permits.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Philippine Navy Still Hopes For Survivors From Ferry Crash

A relative of one of the missing passengers writes down contact numbers on Sunday at the office of the ferry involved in a collision, in Cebu City.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 5:15 pm

Divers in the Philippines are making scant progress in their efforts to recover survivors — or bodies — from the scene where a ferry sank after colliding with a cargo ship near the central port city of Cebu.

About 35 people have been confirmed dead from MV Thomas Aquinas, which was carrying more than 800 passengers when it was struck late Friday and then sank within minutes.

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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt Tense After Bloody Crackdown On Protests

Mourners attend the funeral of Ammar Badie, son of the Muslim Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, at the Katameya cemetery in the New Cairo district on Sunday. Badie was killed in clashes with security forces.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:51 am

This post was updated 1:00 a.m. ET Monday

The Egyptian government says at least 36 people were killed Sunday — Islamists who had been in custody of security forces, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sun August 18, 2013

'The Bone Season': Could This Be The Next Harry Potter? Maybe!

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:51 am

Samantha Shannon is being touted as the new J. K. Rowling. She's 21, a fresh graduate of Oxford, where she was a student when she wrote The Bone Season, the first in a projected seven-novel urban fantasy series. She's got a film deal with the new London studio set up by Andy Serkis of Lord of the Rings fame, and she's been courting booksellers, book reviewers, and fantasy fans for more than a year.

It's tricky when a book arrives with such preliminary brouhaha. I've learned to scrub my mind of hype and leave it to the text. The proof is in the reading.

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Sports
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Bucking Conventional Sports Wisdom

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sports, like anything, really, has its conventional wisdom. If you spend more on your team, they'll win more games. If you had a dismal season last year, this year you're probably not going to the playoffs. So on and so forth.

NPR's Mike Pesca says not so. He joins us now to explain what on Earth he means. Hey, Mike.

(LAUGHTER)

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Wait a minute. You set up a scenario whereby you question what on Earth I mean. But you're the one asking that, so yeah.

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Digital Life
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Kitchens Of The Future Will Really Know How To Cook

A woman checks out a smart refrigerator at a consumer electronics show in 2012.
Samsung USA

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:35 pm

Kitchens are getting smarter.

Some refrigerators can let you know when the door is open, or if the milk is past its sell-by date. They make ice at night during less expensive, off-peak energy hours. There are dishwashers that can contact a repairman.

It probably won't be long before you can become Facebook friends with your microwave.

The first microwave oven — the Radarange — weighed 750 pounds and was bought by a Cleveland restaurant in 1947 for $3,000. Later home models had a pull-out box for recipe cards. Paper recipe cards. So quaint.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

A Matter Of Succession

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

On-air challenge: You're given two words starting with the letter S. For each pair, give a third word — also starting with S — that can follow the first one and precede the second one, in each case to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

Last week's challenge: A logic puzzle: "Nieces and nephews have I none, but that man's father is my father's son." What is the gender of the speaker? And who is the speaker referring to?

Answer: Male, the speaker is referring to his own son.

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Middle East
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Cairo Mosque Is A Protest Flashpoint

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. At least 800 people have been killed in Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last month and the subsequent protests launched by his supporters. Yesterday, a Cairo mosque was the scene of a struggle between police and soldiers and Morsi supporters who had taken shelter there.

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Middle East
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Attacks On Egypt's Christians Increase

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The violence that has gripped Egypt since the removal of President Mohamed Morsi has increased tensions between the majority Sunni Muslims and minority Christian communities. Reverend Mikhail is a Christian pastor in Alexandria. For safety concerns he asked us not to use his first name or the name of his church.

Reverend, first of all thank you very much for joining us.

REVEREND MIKHAIL: Thank you.

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Middle East
6:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt On Edge After A Week Of Deadly Violence

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

In Egypt, an emergency cabinet meeting is scheduled for today and more anti-government marches are planned by the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters. The government says 173 people were killed in recent days, bringing the week's death toll to nearly 800, with more than a thousand arrested. As international criticism of the violence mounts, Egypt's stock market opened sharply lower and businesses are suspending operations out of security concerns.

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