Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

The Art And Craft Of Obituary Writing

When a loved one passes away they are often eulogized in church services, visitations and during the funeral. Every day folks and public figures are also remembered in the newspaper, from the smallest obituary to fully written memorials. Obituary writing has become an art form and Ken Garfield has practiced that form for years. He says an obituary can teach the writer, the public and even loved ones, things about the deceased they never fully knew before. He'll share what he has learned about writing obituaries, we'll meet the president of the Society of Professional Obituary writers and we hope you'll share some the most memorable obituaries you have read, when Charlotte Talks.

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The Two-Way
6:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Senate Confirms James Comey As Next FBI Director

Former Deputy Attorney General James B. Comey waits to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington on May 15, 2007. NPR has learned that Comey is in line to become President Obama's choice as the next FBI director.
Susan Walsh AP

With a vote of 93-1, the Senate confirmed James Comey as the next director of the FBI. Comey will replace Robert Mueller.

NPR's Carrie Johnson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Comey is a Republican and a former Justice Department official during the George W. Bush years. Civil rights groups questioned his record on surveillance and harsh interrogation of terrorism suspects.

"But after Kentucky Republican Rand Paul lifted his hold on the FBI nominee, Comey sailed through the full Senate.

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Code Switch
6:10 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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Shots - Health News
6:09 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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The Two-Way
5:51 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Police Arrest Woman Suspected Of Vandalizing Washington Icon

Green paint was discovered in two chapels inside the National Cathedral in Washington on Monday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:07 pm

Police in Washington, D.C., say a woman has been arrested, suspected of splattering green paint across the organ at the National Cathedral, the Episcopalian church that has long served as the country's spiritual home.

CNN's Dan Merica tweeted this photo of church:

NPR member station WAMU reports the arrest follows a series of similar acts of vandalism across Washington.

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A Blog Supreme
5:30 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

'A Walking Encyclopedia Of Rhythms': Remembering Steve Berrios

Steve Berrios performs with the Fort Apache Band in New York City earlier in 2013.
Andrea Zapata-Girau Courtesy of Jerry Gonzalez

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 4:20 pm

It is not easy to play both jazz drum set and Afro-Caribbean percussion. Lots of drummers do it, but few have mastered it in a way that makes their sound in either style unmistakable from the first beat.

The music community lost one of those true innovators Wednesday with the death of percussionist Steve Berrios in New York at age 68. Berrios could move seamlessly from jazz to Afro-Cuban rhythms in a way that perfectly reflected his bicultural roots.

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Middle East
5:22 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Egyptian Crisis Slows Flow Through Gaza's Smuggling Tunnels

Workers in the Gaza Strip load a truck with sacks of cement that arrived via a smuggling tunnel from Egypt. Gazan officials say the Egyptian military has cracked down on smuggling tunnels that bring many goods into Gaza.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

At the very southern end of the Gaza Strip on Monday morning, sweaty men in bare feet carried bags of cement on their backs from a stack near a gaping hole in the ground to a waiting truck.

The cement had come through a tunnel from Egypt, a lucky load that made it.

Over the past several weeks, Egypt's military has cracked down on the smuggling tunnels that bring many goods into Gaza.

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All Tech Considered
5:20 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers

Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, 33, concentrates on a yellow blinking light during a microprocessor workshop with HacDC.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

Two satellites set for launch Sunday will soon be in the hands of ordinary people because they run on a tiny microchip that anyone can program.

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All Tech Considered
5:20 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

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Environment
5:20 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

The remains of a tree are seen in front of a boulder in the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico in August 2012. The Las Conchas Fire torched the land in 2011, burning through more than 150,000 acres of forest.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

On any given day, there's a wildfire burning somewhere in the U.S. — and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Many western forests have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire.

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