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Police fire tear gas into the protest on Tuesday night
Ely Portillo / Charlotte Observer

The streets leading into Old Concord Road were blocked off to vehicle traffic for much of the night, but pedestrians were allowed to walk to and from the protest site. And as WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn reports, people were still heading to the scene after midnight with the smell of tear gas hanging heavily in the air.

CMPD officers blocking Old Concord Rd. at Suther Rd.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Roughly 1,000 protesters marched through portions of the University area Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning in response to a police shooting death of an African-American man.

Roy Cooper
David Boraks / WFAE

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper told a business lunch in Charlotte Tuesday that the laws and policies of Gov. Pat McCrory and Republicans are damaging the state's reputation. Cooper says he'll work with citizens and business leaders to repair it.

Cooper, currently the state’s attorney general, made his pitch for the governor's job at the Hood Hargett Breakfast Club at the Palm Restaurant, where McCrory spoke last week.

People gather on a hill as Charlotte police work the scene at The Village at College Downs apartments on Tuesday, September 20, 2016.
Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

At least a dozen police were injured during protests in Charlotte, following the shooting death by police of an African-American man Tuesday. Police say he was armed, his family says he was not.

WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn has more. 

North Carolina has already lost a series of college sports tournaments because of opposition to House Bill 2. The NCAA and Atlantic Coast Conference announced last week they are pulling 17 events from the state for this academic year.  

Now the fate of another event is uncertain.  Southern Conference officials are considering whether to relocate the basketball tournament scheduled to take place March 2-6, 2017 in Asheville, because of the state's controversial law that limits non-discrimination protection for LGBT people.  

Courtesy of Lawana Mayfield

Charlotte City Council did not bite Monday night on state legislative leaders' offer over House Bill 2. State lawmakers said  if council rescinded protections for LGBT people passed early this year, the General Assembly would repeal the bill.  

"It wasn't an offer it was a demand and bullying," says council member Lawana Mayfield. "We teach our children that bullying is wrong, but yet as adults and as political figures to use bullying sends a very mixed message across the state and across the nation."  

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry Tuesday morning.  

Michael Tomsic

Supporters of LGBT protections in Charlotte showed their appreciation for something the city council did not do Monday night. They clapped loudly for city leaders who said they wouldn’t walk back their nondiscrimination ordinance as part of a deal with state leaders in Raleigh.

Jenn Durfey / Flickr

Gas prices went up an average of 11 cents over the past week, following a massive leak in a gas pipeline that’s a major supplier to the Southeast. Some local stations are running out of fuel and the attorney general’s office has received hundreds of price gouging complaints.


A federal appeals court says it's legal for Rowan County Commissioners to deliver prayers before their meetings. The decision out Monday reverses a lower court ruling that declared the practice unconstitutional.

I’ll repeal mine if you repeal yours.

That’s the message North Carolina’s Republican leaders have been sending to the Charlotte City Council the past few days. The governor and legislative leaders have said they’re prepared to repeal House Bill 2 in full if, and only if, Charlotte votes to repeal its expanded non-discrimination ordinance first.

This morning Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said no deal.

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