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The state's congressional district boundaries have since been redrawn, which has reshaped the 1st and 12th districts.
ncleg.net

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 5-3 decision that two North Carolina Congressional Districts are illegal racial gerrymanders. The ruling upholds one issued in 2016 by a lower court. Guest host Tom Bullock and experts will talk about what the ruling means, its potential for wide-ranging precedent, and how it will affect North Carolina voters.

The Supreme Court ruled the 12th (orange) and 1st (yellow) districts were illegal because race played too large a role in their creation.
ncleg.net

Updated 1:34 p.m.
In a 5-3 decision, the US Supreme Court ruled Monday that two North Carolina Congressional Districts are illegal racial gerrymanders. The ruling upholds one issued last year by a lower court. And it could have wide ranging precedent.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board members are set to vote on the controversial student assignment plan on Wednesday. If approved, 7,100 students -- 5 percent of CMS’ enrollment -- would shift to new schools. Most are elementary students, such as those at three prek-8 schools in West Charlotte. The plan would break these schools up, but many parents find the proposed changes unsettling.

A conceptual drawing of what the Gateway Station could look like, from a November study.
Charlotte Area Transit System

Plans to build a new "multi-modal" transit center in Uptown Charlotte could take a step forward at Monday night's City Council meeting.  The Gateway Station project is designed to provide easier connections between the city's various forms of public transit, creating a central hub for passenger trains, CATS and Greyhound buses, the city streetcar, and possible future commuter rail service. 

Diedra Laird / Charlotte Observer

There's a lot of focus on getting low-income students to make the grade. But many of these students are already achieving and still don't get into gifted or accelerated classes. A new series by the Charlotte Observer and Raleigh News Observer looks at why that happens. Reporters examined seven years of data and found that 9,000 low-income children in North Carolina were counted out of classes that could have opened new opportunities.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE-FM

The theatre critic gets little respect these days. While performers are lavished with praise and adulation, taking extended bows and twirling through planned encores, there the critic sits, scribbling away several rows back, then staying up at night composing a review, only to be lambasted by the cast and crew the day after if the production is described as anything less than a rapturous sensation.

An NCDOT traffic camera showed I-77 northbound at Mile 21 jammed around 2 p.m. on May 12 because of work on the damaged sign near Exit 31.
NCDOT

Updated 4:15 p.m.
A truck driver who struck an overhead sign while working on the I-77 widening project in Mooresville last week is facing charges after police found he did not have a valid license. The accident led to a day-long backup on the interstate and side roads in the Lake Norman area.

Mark James / Charlotte Observer

Hoarding $70 million in Medicaid money that should be spent on patients while spending lavishly on CEO pay and luxury board retreats. These are just some of the findings laid out in a state audit of Cardinal Innovations Healthcare. The company says the spending is justified.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts speaks at a debate Thursday at Reeder Memorial Baptist Church with challengers Joel Ford and Vi Lyles.
David Boraks / WFAE

At a debate in northwest Charlotte Thursday night, the city's three Democratic mayoral candidates faced an audition of sorts - for an endorsement by the Black Political Caucus of Charlotte-Mecklenburg. Filing isn’t even open yet for the Sept. 12 primary. But the group plans to make an unusual early endorsement in the coming days.

www.ncwd.uscourts.gov

There was a big gang round up Thursday morning in North Carolina and a handful of other east coast states. Eighty-three people, accused of belonging to the United Blood Nation gang, face federal charges involving murder, racketeering, credit card fraud, and bank fraud.

Most are from the Charlotte region, including Shelby and Gastonia. U.S. Attorney Jill Westmoreland Rose said the crackdown should serve as a warning to others.

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