News

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Updated at 5:56 p.m.

Charlotte City Attorney Bob Hagemann says he never advised the mayor or city council to halt the practice of praying before council meetings. That's despite the mayor saying the decision was made on the "expert advice of our attorney."

In an interview with WFAE, Hagemann clarified that while he told city council that not praying before meetings is "100 percent constitutionally defensible," he did not expressly recommend that council cease the practice.

A main building on the site once was a Ford Model T factory and Army missile plant. More recently, it was a Rite-Aid distribution center.
David Boraks / WFAE

The Charlotte City Council on Monday approved a rezoning for the 72-acre Camp North End development off Statesville Avenue, north of uptown.  

A long-running tradition was missing from the beginning of last night’s Charlotte City Council meeting:  an opening prayer.  As the meeting started, Mayor Jennifer Roberts said:

"We are not going to have an invocation this evening. We are going to change the way that we conduct it, on the expert advice of our attorney, with the concern over freedom of religion and separation of church and state and some other recent court rulings."

Santee Cooper and SCE&G had been adding two reactors at the V.C. Summer nuclear plant in Fairfield County.
Santee Cooper

COLUMBIA, S.C.  — The retiring CEO of one of two utilities that abandoned a nuclear power project in South Carolina argues against selling the pieces, saying the reactors will be completed someday.

Civil War reenactment at Historic Brattonsville in 2016.
Culture & Heritage Museums / Mike Watts

Historic Brattonsville in York County,  S.C., says it's canceling a planned Civil War re-enactment next month amid the national debate over Civil War memorials and concerns over visitors' safety.

File photo / The Charlotte Observer

Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017

The rise and fall of the PTL empire is revisited in a new book. A conversation with the author, then a look at an acclaimed play on religion, "The Christians," making its Charlotte debut.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

A city council meeting following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last year was out of control at times as a long list of residents spoke, calling for justice. And then there was this 9-year-old, Zianna Oliphant who grabbed everyone’s attention.

This week marks one year since Charlotte police fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott and protests  erupted across the city.  On today's Charlotte Talks,  host Mike Collins and WFAE  reporters talk to key people who found themselves at the center of those events last year.  We hear their impressions of what happened, their reactions in the moment and with the distance of time.  

Lisa Worf / WFAE

CMPD Chief Kerr Putney speaks with a lot of bluntness these days. Take this example from a Charlotte Talks Public Conversation this summer. He addressed the lack of economic opportunity and other social challenges that disproportionately affect minority neighborhoods.

“I’m not going to say Kumbaya and let’s overcome everything. What I’m going to say is if you have financial means, support the work that needs to be done that changes these outcomes, and then you get out of the way and shut your mouth. And then let those of us who are willing to change outcomes, do so," Putney said at the July 12 event.

By JIM SALTER and SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Protests turned violent for a second night near St. Louis following the acquittal of a white former police officer in the fatal shooting of a black man, as a small group of demonstrators refused to disperse, breaking windows at dozens of businesses and throwing objects at police, who moved in with hundreds of officers in riot gear to make arrests.

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