NCDENR http://wfae.org en Dan River Dredging Finished, Less Than 10 Percent Of Ash Removed http://wfae.org/post/dan-river-dredging-finished-less-10-percent-ash-removed <p>Duke Energy announced it has finished actively cleaning coal ash from the Dan River, a little less than six months after a massive spill turned the water gray. The bulk of the ash will remain in the river.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Between 30,000 and 40,000 tons of ash, containing heavy metals including arsenic and lead, spilled into the river in February. It flowed down the Dan River, collecting in pockets on its banks and bottom.</span></p> Wed, 16 Jul 2014 23:41:30 +0000 Ben Bradford 55067 at http://wfae.org Dan River Dredging Finished, Less Than 10 Percent Of Ash Removed NC Senate Unanimously Opposes House Coal Ash Changes http://wfae.org/post/nc-senate-unanimously-opposes-house-coal-ash-changes <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The North Carolina House and Senate have found another area of disagreement to go along with the budget. One of the legislature’s top priorities—a bill to address coal ash—failed to advance to the governor’s desk Monday night.</span></p><p> Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:21:44 +0000 Ben Bradford 54915 at http://wfae.org Four Things To Know About The House Coal Ash Bill http://wfae.org/post/four-things-know-about-house-coal-ash-bill <p>The question about what to do with coal ash around the state came to the North Carolina House floor last night. In a contentious three hour debate, Republican lawmakers defended controversial changes to the bill they received from the Senate and defeated more than a dozen amendments. As the bill nears becoming law, here are four things to know about the latest version.</p><p></p><p> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 13:18:16 +0000 Ben Bradford 54149 at http://wfae.org Four Things To Know About The House Coal Ash Bill Contentious Debate, Unanimous Vote For Coal Ash Bill In NC Senate http://wfae.org/post/contentious-debate-unanimous-vote-coal-ash-bill-nc-senate <p>The North Carolina Senate tentatively approved a bill last night that would determine what happens to the coal ash ponds at all 14 of Duke Energy’s coal plants in the state. The debate was far more rancorous than the final vote.</p><p></p><p> Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:18:47 +0000 Ben Bradford 53629 at http://wfae.org Contentious Debate, Unanimous Vote For Coal Ash Bill In NC Senate NC Senate Considers Coal Ash As Regulators Find More Leaks http://wfae.org/post/nc-senate-considers-coal-ash-regulators-find-more-leaks <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The state has cited Duke for 11 leaks at the Riverbend, Allen, Marshall, Cliffside, and Buck plants. Bridget Munger, spokeswoman for the state Division of Dam Safety, says they range in size and significance.</span></p><p></p><p> Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:50:45 +0000 Ben Bradford 53061 at http://wfae.org NC Senate Considers Coal Ash As Regulators Find More Leaks NC And Climate Change, Part 2: The Top Threats http://wfae.org/post/nc-and-climate-change-part-2-top-threats <p>The southeast United States faces a host of threats from climate change. Intensifying temperatures and extreme weather could affect anything from dam safety to airport tarmacs to the range of diseases that can thrive. The most recent National Climate Assessment points to three areas most threatened: coastal communities, the agriculture industry, and water availability. In the second of a three part series, WFAE looks at how the state is, or isn’t, preparing to adapt.</p><p> Thu, 29 May 2014 09:30:00 +0000 Ben Bradford 51860 at http://wfae.org NC And Climate Change, Part 2: The Top Threats NC And Climate Change, Part 1: Republican Leaders Stop Preparation http://wfae.org/post/nc-and-climate-change-part-1-republican-leaders-stop-preparation <p>North Carolina has a complicated relationship with climate change. The state was one of the first to consider its impacts and possible responses, but today—as reports like the National Climate Assessment issue ever more dire warnings—few policies are in place to adapt. In the first of a three part series, WFAE&nbsp;explores the shift.</p><p></p><p> Wed, 28 May 2014 09:30:00 +0000 Ben Bradford 51787 at http://wfae.org NC And Climate Change, Part 1: Republican Leaders Stop Preparation Dan River Update: A Fraction Of Ash Removed http://wfae.org/post/dan-river-update-fraction-ash-removed <p>The Environmental Protection Agency announced it has struck an agreement with Duke Energy to clean up coal ash from the Dan River. The EPA has been overseeing the company’s response, since a storage pond failed at a Duke coal plant in February, spilling at least 30,000 tons of the waste into the river. But the agreement binds Duke to clean up ash as the EPA directs and to reimburse the agency for its costs. EPA officials say that comes to about $800,000 for the past three-plus months of clean-up.</p><p> Fri, 23 May 2014 01:57:50 +0000 Ben Bradford 51515 at http://wfae.org Dan River Update: A Fraction Of Ash Removed New Coal Ash Proposal, Same As The Old One? http://wfae.org/post/new-coal-ash-proposal-same-old-one <p>Two weeks ago, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory released a plan, billed as a solution for the coal ash ponds leaking polluted water into rivers and lakes around North Carolina. But environmental groups are crying foul—because the governor’s proposal resembles a previous, widely-criticized agreement between the administration and Duke Energy, which was thrown out after a coal ash pond collapsed into the Dan River in February.</p><p></p><p> Mon, 28 Apr 2014 14:08:49 +0000 Ben Bradford 49867 at http://wfae.org New Coal Ash Proposal, Same As The Old One? Duke Energy, State Officials Portray Coal Ash Removal As Lengthy, Costly http://wfae.org/post/duke-energy-state-officials-portray-coal-ash-removal-lengthy-costly <p>State regulators and Duke Energy officials poured cold water on proposals by environmental groups about what to do with more than 100 millions of tons of coal ash, describing total removal of the ash as lengthy and costly.</p><p></p><p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:25:43 +0000 Ben Bradford 49542 at http://wfae.org Duke Energy, State Officials Portray Coal Ash Removal As Lengthy, Costly