Science & Environment http://wfae.org en Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp http://wfae.org/post/want-reduce-your-carbon-footprint-choose-mackerel-over-shrimp Small fatty fish like mackerel, herring, sardines and anchovies are high in <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/14/329529110/food-mood-connection-how-you-eat-can-amp-up-or-tamp-down-stress">omega-3s</a>, <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=111509588">vitamin D</a> and low on the food chain.<p>Those shining attributes have earned them plenty of nods from doctors and environmentalists alike, as we've <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/14/329529110/food-mood-connection-how-you-eat-can-amp-up-or-tamp-down-stress">reported</a>. Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:13:00 +0000 April Fulton 55879 at http://wfae.org Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp The 30-Foot High Pile Of Bones That Could Be A DNA Treasure Trove http://wfae.org/post/30-foot-high-pile-bones-could-be-dna-treasure-trove <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.<img src="http://www.google-analytics.com/__utm.gif?utmac=UA-5828686-4&utmdt=The+30-Foot+High+Pile+Of+Bones+That+Could+Be+A+DNA+Treasure+Trove&utme=8(APIKey)9(MDAyMjA2NTMyMDEyMjUzNzM0MjA0ODc5OA004)"/></div><p> Tue, 29 Jul 2014 20:09:00 +0000 editor 55866 at http://wfae.org Welcome To The Nuclear Command Bunker http://wfae.org/post/welcome-nuclear-command-bunker The stretch of Interstate 80 between Cheyenne, Wyo., and Lincoln, Neb., is straight and flat. High plains stretch out on either side.<p>But scattered along this unremarkable road, the Air Force keeps some of its most powerful weapons — <a href="http://www.boeing.com/boeing/history/boeing/minuteman.page">Minuteman III nuclear missiles</a>.<p>Outsiders are rarely allowed to see the missiles up close. Tue, 29 Jul 2014 19:32:00 +0000 Geoff Brumfiel 55858 at http://wfae.org Welcome To The Nuclear Command Bunker Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers http://wfae.org/post/widely-used-insecticides-are-leaching-midwest-rivers A class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, which are used on a lot of big corn and soybean fields, has been getting a pretty bad rap lately.<p>Researchers have implicated these chemicals, which are similar to nicotine, as a contributor to the alarming decline of bee colonies. That led the European Union to place a <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/04/29/179868454/europe-bans-pesticides-in-move-to-protect-honey-bees">moratorium</a> on their use, and environmentalists want the U.S. Tue, 29 Jul 2014 18:23:00 +0000 editor 55850 at http://wfae.org Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes http://wfae.org/post/fist-bumps-pass-along-fewer-germs-handshakes A few weeks ago, we took a look at nonverbal greetings around the world. In Japan, they bow. Ethiopian men touch shoulders. Tue, 29 Jul 2014 18:19:00 +0000 editor 55852 at http://wfae.org Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes White House Says Delayed Action On Climate Change Could Cost Billions http://wfae.org/post/white-house-says-delayed-action-climate-change-could-cost-billions In a report issued Tuesday, the White House warned that the cost of inaction when it comes to climate change outweighs the cost of implementing more-stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.<p><a href="http://time.com/3049465/report-not-acting-on-climate-change-could-have-serious-economic-impact/">Here's how <em>Time</em> boils down the White House's argument</a>:<p><blockquote><p>"A new report estimates the cost of mitigating the effects of climate change could rise by as much as 40% if action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is delayed 10 years — immediately outweighing any potent Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:48:00 +0000 Eyder Peralta 55836 at http://wfae.org This Albino Redwood Tree Isn't Dead — But It Came Close http://wfae.org/post/albino-redwood-tree-isnt-dead-it-came-close <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.<img src="http://www.google-analytics.com/__utm.gif?utmac=UA-5828686-4&utmdt=This+Albino+Redwood+Tree+Isn%27t+Dead+%E2%80%94+But+It+Came+Close&utme=8(APIKey)9(MDAxNzg0MDExMDEyMTYyMjc1MDE3NGVmMw004)"/></div><p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:05:00 +0000 editor 55796 at http://wfae.org To Stop Cheating, Nuclear Officers Ditch The Grades http://wfae.org/post/stop-cheating-nuclear-officers-ditch-grades The young officers at <a href="http://www.warren.af.mil/">F.E. Warren Air Force Base</a> have an enormous job: to keep 150 nuclear-tipped missiles ready to launch at a moment's notice.<p>Understandably, they're expected to know exactly what they're doing.<p>Three times a month, they're tested on the weapons and the codes used to launch them. Anything less than 90 percent is a fail.<p>But until recently, even 90 percent wasn't really good enough. "I was told that if I got a 90 on a test, I was a D student — and I would be treated that way," says Lt. Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:19:00 +0000 Geoff Brumfiel 55776 at http://wfae.org To Stop Cheating, Nuclear Officers Ditch The Grades With Men's Y Chromosome, Size Really May Not Matter http://wfae.org/post/mens-y-chromosome-size-really-may-not-matter Basic biology has it that girls are girls because they have two X chromosomes — the things inside cells that carry our genes. Boys are boys because they have one X and one Y. Recently, though, there's been a lot of debate in scientific circles about the fate of that Y chromosome — the genetic basis of maleness.<p>Very early in the evolution of the Y chromosome, explains <a href="http://wi.mit.edu/people/faculty/page">Dr. David Page</a>, a geneticist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, something pretty dramatic happened: The ancestral Y lost most of its genes. Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:41:00 +0000 Rob Stein 55777 at http://wfae.org With Men's Y Chromosome, Size Really May Not Matter Where The Birds Are Is Not Where You'd Think http://wfae.org/post/where-birds-are-not-where-youd-think This is a trick question. Where would you expect to find the greatest variety of birds?<p>Downtown, in a city?<p>Or far, far from downtown — in the fields, forests, mountains, where people are scarce?<p>Or in the suburbs? Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:19:00 +0000 Robert Krulwich 55775 at http://wfae.org Where The Birds Are Is Not Where You'd Think