World

The Salt
5:42 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Sip It Slowly, And Other Lessons From The Oldest Tea Book In The World

A range of Darjeeling tea at Goomtee Tea Estate in Darjeeling, India.
Jeff Koehler for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:03 pm

At least 2,500 years ago, tea, as we know it, was born.

Back then, it was a medicinal concoction blended with herbs, seeds and forest leaves in the mountains of southwest China. Gradually, as manners of processing and drinking tea were refined, it became imbued with artistic, religious, and cultural notes. Under the Tang Dynasty (AD 618–907), the apogee of ancient Chinese prosperity, the drink involved ritual, etiquette and specific utensils. During this period of splendor, the first book dedicated solely to tea was written by Lu YΓΌ.

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World
5:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

'Journey To Jihad' Tells Story Of Belgian Teenager Who Joined Islamic State

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
5:27 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes β€” they're yellow β€” that help the virus infect its host cells.
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he had contracted Lassa fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to those of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.

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Goats and Soda
4:43 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Blind Waiters Give Diners A Taste Of 'Dinner In The Dark' In Kenya

At the "Dinner in the Dark" restaurant that's just opened in Nairobi, a blind waiter leads guests to their table. The photo was taken during a training session β€” that's why the lights are on.
Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 2:07 pm

Ignatius Agon practices his greeting: "OK, good evening ladies and gentlemen. My name is Ignatius and I am going to guide you into the dark."

It's Monday, and the first day of training for a new restaurant opening this month in Kenya. Diners will be served in the dark. They'll have to find their food with their forks and eat it in a pitch black room.

And the waiters are blind.

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It's All Politics
4:35 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

What Will The Next President Face On #Day1?

The next president to occupy the Oval Office will confront four seemingly intractable problems: stagnant wages, cybersecurity, violent extremism and federal debt.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 11:20 am

Presidential candidates are doing what they have to do at this point in the campaign season β€” they're raising money and strutting their biographies and electoral viability to voters. We haven't heard much yet about policy papers or what they would actually do if they win. But those policy issues will matter β€” as the campaign picks up steam and especially once the next president steps into the Oval Office on Day 1.

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World
4:22 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

U.S., Turkey Divided On Support For Rebel Forces In Syria

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 7:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
4:22 pm
Tue May 26, 2015

Tripoli's Niemeyer Fairground Recalls Happier Times Before Civil War

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 6:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
9:58 am
Tue May 26, 2015

New Mothers Get A New Kind Of Care In Rural Nigeria

How can women in rural Nigeria get the care they need? That's what Columbia University graduate students in public health asked residents of Kadawawa, Nigeria.
Courtesy of Alastair Ager and Alissa Pires

Originally published on Tue May 26, 2015 3:56 pm

How do you help a country struggling to provide quality health care, particularly to its rural citizens?

More doctors would be great. New and better clinics would help. But in some places, community health workers are an important part of the solution.

Community health workers live where they work. They're not trained medical professionals, but they do have "training that is recognized by the health services and national certification authority," according to the World Health Organization.

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The Salt
7:03 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Game For Ancient Grain: Palestinians Find Freekeh Again

In a village outside of Jenin, in the West Bank, Palestinian farmers harvest wheat early and burn the husks to yield the smoky, nutty grain known as freekeh.
Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In early May, Nasser Abufarha drove through the rural farmlands around Jenin in the northern West Bank and noticed the timeless features of village life. Young boys harvested cauliflower bigger than their heads, a sun-beaten old man passed on foot with a hoe propped against his shoulder and middle-aged women strolled to their modest homes on a path between waving wheat fields.

But there was one new element, says Abufarha, a Palestinian-American businessman and the founder of the largest fair trade exporter for Palestinian produce.

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World
5:27 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Canada Cuts Down On Red Tape. Could It Work In The U.S.?

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 11:19 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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