WFAEats

Text and photographs copyright © 2013 by Jeffrey Taylor Mathis. Used by permission of the University of North Carolina Press.

No one predicted the Carolina Panthers would go to the Super Bowl – certainly not when Charlottean Taylor Mathis wrote The Southern Tailgating Cookbook: A Game Day Guide for Lovers of Food, Football, and the South back in 2013.

That's A 'Crock,' Part 2: Eating My Words

Jan 25, 2016
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

The gift card read: “Because I had to make a believer out of you.” Inside the heavy box sat a shiny, new slow-cooker. Less than a week after I’d confessed my deep distrust of them here, my friend Renée Joslyn, down in sunny Miami, sent me one of my very own.

PHOTO/arts Magazine / flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who believe in the magical power of the slow- cooker, and those who don’t.

This writer has always been in the second camp. While I have no problem with the concept of cooking things slowly (hello, barbecue), the thought of setting out food to cook itself unsupervised has always seemed a little too futuristic, not to mention downright dangerous (hello, salmonella).

Every now and then, a Julia Child or Michael Pollan come along and changes the way we eat.

Could Jean Kristeller, America's leading mindful eating researcher and the author of a new self-help book, The Joy of Half a Cookie, published Tuesday, be next? I'm of a mind to say maybe.

Hold The Lettuce: A Thought For Food

Jan 11, 2016
rick / flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

As I pushed the cardboard tomato aside I shoulder-squirmed to myself: “Icky.” And that quarter-inch-thick Vidalia onion (take note, close-talkers): “Do I intend on talking to anyone for the next 8 hours?” Iceberg leaf; well, I don’t do iceberg.

The point? I blew it. I didn’t tell the server (nor did he ask) to hold the “OLT.” I just committed vegetable murder at the expense of cross-country fare masquerading as local.

Of New Year's Feasts And Fortune

Dec 30, 2015
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

Luck: We crave it, savor it, and fear we’ll never get enough. In kitchens around the world, there are plenty of ways to invite good luck to the table, and never a better time to explore the possibilities than at the fresh start of a new year.

At the stroke of midnight on December 31, revelers in Spain eat twelve grapes for luck, one for each month of the coming year. The practice began a century ago when growers sought a creative solution to an overly plentiful grape harvest. The custom has since spread to Venezuela and other Spanish-speaking countries.

hello-julie / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It's going to be O.K. Everyone forgets a gift or two. Here's a handful of locally-made delectables that are easy to find and nice to share at holiday gatherings.

Tamra Wilson

Have you noticed the trend of putting food on Christmas trees? No, I’m not talking about strings of actual cranberries, popcorn or candy canes, but fake edibles: vegetables and fruit and baked goods, seafood and sandwiches.

A gardener friend dove into the produce theme recently with glass ornaments depicting eggplants, lettuce, corn, broccoli, onions, strawberries, grapes, and tomatoes. It was quite a colorful stunner.

Lynn Caldwell

Imagine: You are relocated to another country after months, if not years, of desperate and courageous efforts to protect your family. You essentially arrive with nothing but the clothes on your back. Everything about your new country is unfamiliar.

This is the reality for thousands of refugees all over the world. Forced to leave their country of origin, most arrive in the U.S. with an insufficient support system, no job, very little knowledge of English – and no hope of ever returning home.

alamodern.com

Most gift registries focus on the kitchen, and one list I perused recently was no exception. Among the usual pots, flatware and dishes I saw several gadgets: a digital rice cooker, egg slicer and an apple wedger.

I shook my head. After 38 years, I’ve never owned those last three items, but I’ve somehow prepared more than 21,000 meals.

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