Obamacare

healthcare.gov

The Obama administration is touting a new argument for why states like North Carolina should expand Medicaid. Federal researchers found in states that already have, the premiums people pay on the Obamacare exchanges are lower.

Kaiser Health News

In North Carolina, the two largest remaining insurance companies on the Obamacare exchange are requesting average premium increases of more than 18 percent.

healthcare.gov

The Obamacare exchange in North Carolina will experience some turnover among insurance companies next year. It'll likely result in three companies still taking part but only one or two in most counties.

In Charlotte on Friday, CEOs from some of North Carolina's biggest players in health care gave their take on why costs are rising and what's being done about it. They spoke at the Charlotte Chamber's health care summit.

Kaiser Health News

Health insurance premiums have been rising on the Obamacare exchanges, and North Carolina had some of the country's biggest increases this year. But according to a recent federal report, those increases made very little difference in what consumers actually pay.

North Carolina’s dominant insurance company had even deeper losses on the Obamacare exchange last year. But BlueCross BlueShield’s overall business ended 2015 in better shape financially than the year before.

CMS.gov

Health insurance companies will pay North Carolinians $8.5 million in rebates. It's the latest round of payments required under Obamacare if insurers spend too much on profits or administrative costs.

healthcare.gov screenshot
WFAE

On the Obamacare exchanges, there are large disparities in how health insurance premiums are changing next year based on where you live. While coverage is getting cheaper in states like Indiana and Mississippi, in North Carolina, it's becoming much more expensive. Federal data show that North Carolina's average premium increase is among the highest in the country.

Michael Tomsic

Roughly half a million North Carolinians could soon lose money they depend on for health insurance. The U.S. Supreme Court will rule as soon as next week on a key part of the Affordable Care Act. It governs federal subsidies for states like North Carolina that did not set up their own exchange or marketplace. It may sound wonky, but the result could be disastrous for many low-income Americans and insurance markets.

Alan Cleaver/Flickr
Alan Cleaver / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

In North Carolina, health insurance companies are planning to raise average premiums between 11 and 26 percent next year on the Affordable Care Act exchange or marketplace.

The state's dominant insurance company, BlueCross BlueShield, wants to raise average premiums about 26 percent – almost twice as much as last year's increase.   

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