NC voting

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The legal fight over North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul played out one step below the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and others tried to convince the federal appeals court in Virginia that the 2013 law is discriminatory.

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Attorneys for the U.S. Justice Department and North Carolina square off Tuesday before the federal appeals court in Virginia. The Justice Department, the League of Women Voters and others are appealing a judge's decision that upheld North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul.

Denise Cross Photography

The League of Women Voters, the North Carolina NAACP and others are appealing a federal ruling that upheld North Carolina's 2013 voting overhaul. At the heart of the case is this question: does the law disenfranchise African-Americans? WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Duncan McFadyen to discuss how the federal judge addressed that question in his ruling this week.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge in Winston-Salem ruled Monday night that North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul is constitutional. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and others sued over the 2013 law, calling it one of the most restrictive in the nation. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to walk through the decision.

voterid.nc.gov

After hearing exhaustive arguments over the past year and a half, a federal judge in Winston-Salem is set to rule on North Carolina’s sweeping election overhaul. Two summers ago, the U.S. Justice Department and others suing North Carolina tried to convince judge Thomas Schroeder to put the changes on hold. This past summer, judge Schroeder presided over a three-week trial on whether some changes should be thrown out entirely. And over the past week or so, he heard the final phase of the lawsuits: the challenge to voter ID. 

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North Carolina’s sweeping election overhaul is back in a federal court in Winston-Salem this week. A judge there heard arguments this summer over changes to early voting, same-day registration and out-of-precinct voting. Now, the focus is photo ID. WFAE’s Michael Tomsic has been covering the lawsuits and joined Marshall Terry to break down the latest. 

Democracy North Carolina

A coalition of voting groups filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday accusing North Carolina of violating a voter registration law. The groups and the state had been in discussions about avoiding the lawsuit, but the two now disagree on how much progress is being made.

santheo / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Early voting begins Thursday for local government elections, and many North Carolina voters may be surprised to hear they can register and vote at the same time. That's because some changes from the state's 2013 election overhaul are on hold as lawsuits play out.

Flickr/Vox Efx

The U.S. Justice Department and others suing over North Carolina's 2013 election overhaul are looking to settle one part of their case: voter ID.

The fate of North Carolina's voting overhaul is now in the hands of a federal judge, after a three-week trial wrapped up Friday in Winston-Salem. The overhaul cut the early voting period by a week, eliminated same-day registration, and prohibited the counting of out-of-precinct ballots. Federal judge Thomas Schroeder had a variety of questions for those suing and defending North Carolina. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was in the courtroom and joined Jennifer Montague to discuss closing arguments.

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