Early Voting

Nick de la Canal

Hillary Clinton staged a doubleheader in North Carolina Sunday, beginning the day with supporters in Raleigh, then traveling to Charlotte, where several hundred people were squeezed into an outdoor plaza at the University of North Carolina Charlotte to hear the presidential candidate speak.

We're now a little more than two weeks away from election day.  In our discussion this week with political analyst Michael Bitzer, we look at where the big races are in the polls and we also talk about this week's gubernatorial debate and the beginning of early voting.

Denise Cross Photography

Mecklenburg County's board of elections voted Monday night to cut the total hours of early voting by about 9 percent this year. But the state board of elections will have the final say.

I Voted stickers
Tom Bullock / WFAE

The recent federal appeals court decision that struck down North Carolina’s voting law made a lot of things clear. There won’t be voter ID in the November election, for example. But the number of early voting hours remains unclear – and will depend on where you live.

santheo / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

Early voting begins Thursday for local government elections, and many North Carolina voters may be surprised to hear they can register and vote at the same time. That's because some changes from the state's 2013 election overhaul are on hold as lawsuits play out.

On day two, the trial over North Carolina's election overhaul touched on the state's long history of racial discrimination and its brief debate over sweeping voting changes. The U.S. Justice Department, the League of Women Voters and others suing North Carolina used a mix of personal stories and expert testimony in Winston-Salem on Tuesday.

One of the major accusations is that state lawmakers intentionally discriminated against minorities when they passed the changes two years ago. How did that argument play out in court yesterday?

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

The federal trial over North Carolina’s sweeping election overhaul began Monday in Winston-Salem with pointed accusations in court and a massive march right outside it. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and others are suing the state. They accuse Republican lawmakers of taking aim at several voting methods that minorities disproportionately relied on.

Kandice Phelps and about 70 other young people rode buses from Salisbury to the march. Phelps is a 17-year-old African-American who plans to be the first from her family to go to college. 

Google Earth

A federal trial starts in Winston-Salem on Monday morning that will have big implications for voting rights in North Carolina and, potentially, across the country. The U.S. Justice Department and several groups are suing North Carolina over the sweeping election overhaul it passed two years ago. Federal appeals court judges have already indicated that some of the changes likely violate the Voting Rights Act.


Two parts of North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul are now back on hold. But the change likely doesn't mean much because there are no elections between now and the full trial on the overhaul.


A group that's challenging North Carolina's voting overhaul in federal court will take a different argument to state court Friday. The League of Women Voters and other plaintiffs are asking a judge in Raleigh to toss out a photo ID requirement that starts next year.

Alberta Currie has turned out for election after election in North Carolina since the 1950s. But she doesn't have a photo ID and worries she doesn't have the right documents to get one.