CAJA

Glenn H. Burkins for QCitymetro.com

On a recent Thursday in uptown Charlotte, 1,100 Freedom School students unloaded from buses and trooped into the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center to see a matinee performance of “Annie,” the Tony Award-winning musical.

For some, it was their first time attending a Broadway-style show. Reggie Miller of Charlotte was typical.

“I’m excited to see all the action,” said the young African American student. “I’m really looking forward to seeing the dancing. I never saw the movie or the play.”

Elizabeth Catlett, one of the most celebrated African-American artists of the last century, never lived a day in Charlotte. But the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture tapped local collectors for enough Catlett works to fill a gallery. Contributor Greg Lacour has the story.


The Charlotte Film Festival is back this year after a two-year hiatus. Festival organizers have formed a group they hope will serve as a hub for year-round film programs in Charlotte. But they’re battling their own uneven past and a changed movie-going climate.


Fighting Disabilities Through Dance

Jun 5, 2015
Greg Lacour / WFAE

A group of 22 dancers staged a year-ending public performance last week at the Charlotte Ballet. They weren’t ballet dancers, though. They were people using dance to fight the effects of their disabilities and make friends along the way.


Greg Lacour

Sisters Trish Bowen and Maureen King recently spent their Friday night and Saturday morning at Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center. Their 87-year-old mother had fallen and cut her head.

Winging It: Broadway's Next H!t Musical

Feb 21, 2015
James Shubinsky

Theater and music lovers venturing into Davidson College's Duke Family Theater on Tuesday, Feb. 24, are advised to check their inner adult at the door. A sense of play and a giddy embrace of the unknown are encouraged when New York City maestros of improvisation, Broadway's Next H!t Musical, take the stage. In return, the audience is guaranteed a show they've never seen, plus songs they've never heard — that's because the quick-witted troupe is making it up as they go along.

Greg Lacour

In her 20 years in Charlotte, Rosalia Torres-Weiner has raised two children, worked as a flight attendant, and run a successful mural painting business. As the political fight over immigration policy continues in Washington and in the courts, Torres-Weiner is using her work to give a voice to local Latino immigrants caught in the middle. 


Othalie Graham loves to the tell the story of how, as a teen growing up in Brampton, Ontario, an unlikely meeting with legendary soprano Leontyne Price all but cemented her own future path into the international musical arena and the operatic stage.

“Growing up in Canada, I didn’t have much exposure to opera, let alone black performers,” said Graham, in Charlotte performing the title role of Turandot in Opera Carolina’s current production. My father learned of Price performing with the Toronto Symphony and arranged for me and my mother to go.

Ziad Rabie Talks About Jazz At The Bechtler And Music He Loves

Dec 30, 2014
Bechtler Museum of Modern Art

If you search online for the phrase “don’t like jazz,” you’ll come away with more than 55 million search results. Quiet as it’s kept, despite its uniquely American roots, jazz continues to confound a large segment of the American music audience.

Ziad Rabie, who for nearly five years has been the featured musician at the popular Jazz at the Bechtler series, knows this well. He has seen it firsthand, even among some of his friends and close associates.

Christmas Comes To 'Trailer' Park

Dec 5, 2014
George Hendricks

It’s a smart playwright who creates new Christmas fodder for the stage. People are hungry for holiday cheer.

There’s the nostalgia of “Scrooge!”, and the elegance of “The Nutcracker,” but for a gut-busting piece of bawdy Americana, get your tickets to Actor’s Theatre of Charlotte’s “The Great American Trailer Park Christmas Musical.” It has a long run, but tickets are selling faster than the pancakes at Stacks, where they promise: “If we don’t say y’all, y’all eat for free.”

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