Arts & Life

Theater
7:40 am
Sun June 7, 2015

First-Time Tony Award Nominees Enjoy New Fame, But Keep Day Jobs

Composer John Kander, 88, has received his 12th Tony nomination — this time for The Visit. "I really love the theater ..." he says. "This part, I hate; the idea that suddenly we're all put in a little sandbox where we're supposed to be very competitive with each other. And these are your friends!" Above, Chita Rivera and Michelle Veintimillia in The Visit.
Thom Kaine Courtesy of O+M Co.

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:09 am

It's a quiet afternoon at the Tex-Mex restaurant in Brooklyn where playwright Robert Askins works the day shift twice a week. Even though his play, Hand to God, is on Broadway and he's got a Tony nomination, Askins says he enjoys interacting with the regulars, most of whom know about his other job.

"When you day bar during the weekdays, you're the only one in the restaurant," he says. "So, you run the food and make the drinks and put it on the tables and it's good."

Read more
Author Interviews
7:40 am
Sun June 7, 2015

Deep Connections Link The Stories In 'Louisa Meets Bear'

Originally published on Sun June 7, 2015 12:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Code Switch
4:50 am
Sun June 7, 2015

As 'Orange' Season 3 Begins, We Still Don't Know Why Poussey's In Prison

"Just having people come up to me and tell me how much they appreciate and are affected by my character and by the show --€” I hope that somehow this can become my ministry," Wiley says.
Courtesy of Netflix

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 12:10 pm

In Orange Is the New Black, Poussey Washington is a former military brat serving a six-year sentence in a minimum security women's prison. But even as the Netflix show enters its third season, Samira Wiley, who plays Poussey, has no idea why her character is incarcerated.

"Being honest and being truthful, I have no idea why Poussey is in prison," she admits to NPR's Rachel Martin.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:18 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

'Balm' Looks At Civil War After The Battles, Outside The South

Courtesy of Amistad

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 1:22 pm

Dolen Perkins-Valdez wants to change readers' perspective on the Civil War. Her best-selling debut novel, Wench, explored the lives of slave women — not on Southern plantations, but in a resort for slaveowners' mistresses in Ohio. Her new book, Balm, is set in the postwar period, and it's also in an unexpected place: Chicago.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:14 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Not My Job: Producer Brian Grazer Gets Quizzed On Cattle

Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 12:57 pm

Producer Brian Grazer is responsible for so many movies and TV shows — Splash, Apollo 13, A Beautiful Mind, 24, Empire and many more — it's just easier to list something he didn't produce ... like the new Entourage movie. He's recently written a new book about his lifelong pursuit of curiosity, called A Curious Mind.

Since his last name is Grazer, we've invited him to play a game called "Mooooooooo!" Three questions about cattle.

Read more
Author Interviews
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

A New Judy Blume Novel For Adults Is Always An 'Event'

Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:10 am

Judy Blume, the incomparable writer for young adults, has a new novel for adult adults, about something totally unexpected: People falling from the sky, and how that can change onlookers for life in ways they only see when they're grown. In the Unlikely Event is a story told by a chorus of voices — most of them young — beginning with Miri and her mother, Rusty, who see a fireball fall from the sky in Elizabeth, N.J. "It's not my story, but I was 14 years old, the winter of 1951-1952 when this bizarre thing happened," Blume tells NPR's Scott Simon.

Read more
Author Interviews
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Biker Bars And Holy Rollers Smolder In 'Freedom's Child'

Originally published on Sat June 6, 2015 12:44 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Movies
7:37 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Roy Andersson: From Mordant Ad Director To Philosophical Filmmaker

Andersson's new film, A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, consists of a series of absurdist episodes. It opens with a man (Per Bergqvist) wandering a museum, looking at exhibits of stuffed birds.
Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 10:30 am

Roy Andersson just might be one of the most interesting oddballs in the world of film. His Hollywood fan base includes high-class auteurs like the Wachowski siblings, Darren Aronofsky and Alejandro González Iñárritu — but he's best known in his native Sweden.

Back in 1970, Andersson's first film, A Swedish Love Story, took Europe by storm. He was only 26. "It was a fantastic time for me," he recalls. "However, I was not very happy after that. I was a little depressed. My second movie was a flop in all senses. A very, very big flop."

Read more
Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sat June 6, 2015

In 'History,' Money Makes The World Go 'Round

Money has long been notorious for its way of complicating things. We can never have too much — but most often there's just not enough. In the wrong hands, it breaks bonds and brings down kingdoms. And while it may be the commodity which ties us together as citizens of this world, it's also the thing that, because we need it so, leaves us all complicit in the end.

Read more
U.S.
5:19 am
Sat June 6, 2015

Behind The Camera: How 'Vanity Fair' Got Its 'Call Me Caitlyn' Cover

Vanity Fair's Twitter page shows its July cover with Caitlyn Jenner. The issue and photo shoot had to be planned in secret.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 6:31 pm

Many people may not have read the article but millions of people have seen the cover photo for "Call Me Caitlyn," next month's issue of Vanity Fair, which introduces Caitlyn Jenner to the world. She is the Olympic gold medal winner formerly known as Bruce.

But what was the process of getting the cover done? And how did Vanity Fair keep it a secret? Graydon Carter, editor-in-chief of the magazine, joined Scott Simon from his office in New York. What follows are highlights of their conversation, edited for clarity and space.

Read more

Pages