Arts & Life

Simon Says
8:08 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Syrian Artists Denied Visas, And A Voice In The U.S.

Syria: The Trojan Women inserts current events into an ancient Greek tragedy, performed here in Amman, Jordan, in 2013.
Lynn Alleva Lilley Lynn Alleva Lilley

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 1:53 pm

The Trojan Women, by Euripides, is a Greek tragedy written 2,500 years ago that war keeps timely.

It's about a group of women who struggle to survive in Troy after the town has been sacked. When one of the women cries out, "Our country, our conquered country, perishes ... O land that reared my children!" it's hard not to hear those words echo today, through Syria, in Iraq and in Ukraine.

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Around the Nation
7:47 am
Sat August 30, 2014

The Abercrombie Logo Loses Its Luxe

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 11:29 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
7:47 am
Sat August 30, 2014

If These Shorts Could Talk ... New Book Tells 'Worn Stories'

Ally Lindsay Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

Clothes may not necessarily make the man, but they sure make memories. In her new book, Worn Stories, Emily Spivack compiles reflections from Rosanne Cash, Piper Kerman, Marcus Samuelsson and others about the meaningful articles of clothing stored in their closets.

"I asked them to look for something that they couldn't part with," she tells NPR's Scott Simon. "Something that held some memory, whether it was something spectacular, momentous, wonderful, unusual that happened to them while they were wearing that piece of clothing."

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Music News
7:47 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Taking The Tuba Above And Beyond The Low End

On a new record called Connections: Mind the Gap, tuba player Bob Stewart sums up his career with a showcase of the instrument's versatility.
Courtesy of the artist

On a hot, humid afternoon, Bob Stewart has called a rehearsal at his Harlem apartment. Six musicians are in a circle in the living room — on one side, trumpet and trombone; on the other, cello, viola and violin; and in the middle, the elephant in the room — Stewart's tuba.

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Book News & Features
7:03 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Hopscotching To 100: An Appreciation Of Julio Cortázar

An informal monument to Julio Cortázar on the streets of Buenos Aires.
Getty Images

First thing I noticed on the cover was his mouth, which was half open, midlaugh. Next, his teeth; not the best set I'd ever seen. After that, of course, his pronounced unibrow — thick and equally unbecoming. There was the cat, too, posted on the windowsill. Its eyes were dead set on the playful man with the camera and the mouth and the teeth and bushy eyebrow. All this and the words Save Twilight. I thumbed through the little book some and paid for it — cost me about a dollar at the used book shop.

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Author Interviews
5:23 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Hip-Hop In Print: Brooklyn Publisher Looks To 'Reverse Gentrify' Literature

Rapper Prodigy, shown above performing in New York City, published his debut novel, H.N.I.C., in 2013.
Mike Lawrie Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 7:47 am

At this summer's Calabash International Literary Festival in Jamaica, thousands turned up for readings by big-name authors: Salman Rushdie, Jamaica Kincaid, Zadie Smith and Albert Johnson. Odds are the name Albert Johnson doesn't ring a bell. But if you're a hip-hop fan, you might recognize the author by another name: Prodigy. Off and on for the past 20 years, he's been one half of the acclaimed Queens, N.Y., duo Mobb Deep.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Not My Job: Gov. Deval Patrick Gets Quizzed On Burning Man

Eric Haynes Photo Courtesy of Gov. Deval Patrick's Office

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 12:07 pm

Deval Patrick was elected governor of the commonwealth of Massachusetts in 2006. He's finishing his second and final term, and he clearly no longer cares because he's agreed to join us to play our quiz.

We've invited him to answer three questions about Burning Man, the annual art festival/hippie magnet taking place in the desert of northern Nevada.

This Week's Must Read
4:29 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

In An Earthquake, History Fuels One Writer's Anxiety

San Francisco on fire in the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

While most of America is thinking burgers and swimming this Labor Day weekend, I can't stop thinking about earthquakes.

Last Sunday, a shaker registering magnitude 6.0 struck the Napa Valley in Northern California. It injured dozens and caused about $1 billion in damages. National media coverage focused on how the quake affected the area's famous wine industry — because America needs to know that our stock of cabs and zinfandels is safe.

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Latin America
4:29 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Cantinflas, With His Puns And Satire, Is Back (And Still Relevant)

Mario Moreno, known as Cantinflas, is a beloved icon in Latin America. A new biopic about the comic opens this weekend in the U.S.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

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Author Interviews
1:14 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Florida-Grown Fiction: Hiaasen Satirizes The Sunshine State

Novelist and Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen writes with passion and purpose about the state he loves. His latest book, Bad Monkey, is an offbeat murder mystery set in Key West.

Originally broadcast June 13, 2013.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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