Michael Tomsic

Reporter

Michael Tomsic covers health care, voting rights, NASCAR, peach-shaped water towers and everything in between. He drives WFAE's health care coverage through a partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. He became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways to Connect

www.physiciansfoundation.org

Doctors in North Carolina are feeling the effects of certain national health care trends but bucking others. The Physicians Foundation's 2016 survey shows high burnout but lower hospital consolidation in North Carolina.

UPDATE: The group of young voters appealed the federal district court decision to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. On Oct. 19, that court also denied the young voters' request to adjust early voting plans in five counties. In the fight over early voting in North Carolina, one of the things that stands out in a recent decision is who sat on the sidelines. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and the state chapter of the League of Women Voters did not join a request to adjust early voting plans in five counties. Only one group of plaintiffs from the N.C. voting lawsuits made that request: young voters known as the Duke Intervenors.

Jared C. Tilton/Stewart-Haas Racing via Getty Images / NASCARmedia.com

An aggressive and controversial NASCAR driver will hit the gas one last time at the Charlotte Motor Speedway Saturday night. Tony Stewart has won three championships, become co-owner of a race team and paid numerous fines over his 18 seasons. His style has certainly created some enemies, but it's also why his fans love him and other drivers respect him.

VA.gov

The independent watchdog within the Department of Veterans Affairs reports the Salisbury VA manipulated wait times and amassed a huge backlog of radiology exams.

Michael Tomsic

In Charlotte on Tuesday, First Lady Michelle Obama emphasized how competitive North Carolina has been in the last two presidential elections. She used that message to rally supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Courtesy of the FBI Charlotte Office

Almost five years after Erica Parsons was last seen, detectives have found her body in South Carolina. The bizarre story of the Rowan County teenager's disappearance gained national attention.

www.liberty.edu

The Charlotte police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott last week has a short personal history with CMPD but a long family one. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been researching officer Brentley Vinson, who, like Scott, is African-American. He joined Mark Rumsey to discuss what we know.

The shattered windows of an Uptown store.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Some uptown businesses are cleaning up Thursday afternoon. That’s after rioters smashed windows and threw trash cans during the second night of anger over the fatal police shooting of an African-American man.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why.

Michael Tomsic

Supporters of LGBT protections in Charlotte showed their appreciation for something the city council did not do Monday night. They clapped loudly for city leaders who said they wouldn’t walk back their nondiscrimination ordinance as part of a deal with state leaders in Raleigh.

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