Michael Tomsic


Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He’s covered everything from a U.S. presidential visit and a shortage of life-saving cancer drugs to a college football scandal and a cutting-edge art exhibit. Michael has interned with Weekends on All Things Considered in Washington, D.C., where he contributed to the show’s cover stories, produced interviews with Nas and Branford Marsalis, and reported a story about a surge of college graduates joining the military. At UNC, he was the managing editor of the student radio newscast, Carolina Connection. He got his start in public radio as an intern with WHQR in Wilmington, N.C., where he grew up.

Ways to Connect


A federal lawsuit involving a transgender high school student in Virginia is leading to heated political rhetoric in North Carolina.

Republican Governor Pat McCrory is criticizing state Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat, for not getting involved in the case. And North Carolina Senate leader Phil Berger put out a statement Tuesday that makes it seem like Cooper is in favor of "forcing middle school-aged boys and girls to use the same locker room."


Health insurance companies will pay North Carolinians $8.5 million in rebates. It's the latest round of payments required under Obamacare if insurers spend too much on profits or administrative costs.

S.C. Agriculture Department

Historic rainfall is making this a grim year for one of the biggest industries in the Carolinas: farming. Just when fall crops were ready to harvest, catastrophic floods drowned fields and sidelined farm workers. Some in South Carolina say their losses are so severe that they may go out of business.

MIG, Inc.

The big players in Charlotte’s development presented their new plan for the northern end of uptown Thursday night. The North Tryon plan has been a year and a half in the making, with big business, local government, the arts and charitable organizations all playing a role.


Lowe's increased its profit for the most recent quarter by 26 percent compared to the same period a year ago. The earnings report for the Mooresville-based home improvement company beat analyst expectations.

Although the overall retail market has been weak lately, Lowe's earnings show a growing number of consumers willing to upgrade appliances, renovate decks and take on other home projects.

On a call with investors, CEO Robert Niblock said the company's same-store sales in the U.S. increased 5 percent compared to the same quarter a year ago.

Brian Strickland / news.unchealthcare.org

The name that UNC Health Care is giving a children's clinic in Raleigh has been raising a lot of eyebrows. It'd be called the Krispy Kreme Challenge Children's Specialty Clinic. But criticism from the medical community at UNC and elsewhere is making the health care system rethink that choice.


Sometimes it really is just in your head.

Wake Forest researchers have found that mindfulness meditation has a significant impact on pain relief compared to using a placebo.


A fiery state lawmaker from Mecklenburg County is retiring after next year. Republican Senator Bob Rucho of Matthews has represented the area off and on since 1996. When the GOP gained control of the legislature after the 2010 election, Rucho played a significant role in some of the state's major legislative changes. WFAE's Michael Tomsic sat down with him Tuesday and filed this report.

Duke Energy/Flickr

Duke Energy's latest earnings report shows profits declined 27 percent from the same period a year ago. The Charlotte-based company's net income was $932 million through the end of September, which missed analyst expectations.

Weak results internationally and legal settlements in the U.S. hurt Duke Energy's bottom line. The settlements in the quarter were related to a coal plant in Indiana and cleaning up coal ash in North Carolina.

healthcare.gov screenshot

On the Obamacare exchanges, there are large disparities in how health insurance premiums are changing next year based on where you live. While coverage is getting cheaper in states like Indiana and Mississippi, in North Carolina, it's becoming much more expensive. Federal data show that North Carolina's average premium increase is among the highest in the country.