Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication.  He divides his time between delivering newscasts during the day at the top of every hour and reporting on everything from hot peppers to a museum dedicated to the theory that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina.    Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways To Connect

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

From class size and teacher pay to charter schools, changing test standards and the common core, public education has been big news of late.

Tuesday night, WFAE will hold a public conversation on the State of Public Education. The event begins at 7 at the UNC Charlotte Center City Auditorium. WFAE’s Tom Bullock will moderate the conversation. He spoke with WFAE Morning Edition host Marshall Terry.


The stories of violins recovered from the Holocaust and the people who played them are the focus of an event this evening at UNC Charlotte. Music professor James Grymes will read from his book, “Violins of Hope.” He was inspired to write the book two years ago when the violins were part of an exhibit on campus.  That exhibit marked the first time the violins were on display in the U.S. His research included a visit to the Israeli violinmaker who restored the violins.


WFAE / WFAE

There’s been a rise in prepper culture over the last decade. Preppers are people who stockpile food, water, weapons and other items for survival in the event of a major crisis.  It’s turned into a boom industry.  Just look to your TV for proof.  There’s several prepper reality shows, such as Doomsday Preppers on the National Geographic Channel.

Ralph Broome has joined the industry. He’s the owner of what’s being described as Charlotte’s first store for preppers, Carolina Preppers and Survivors on South Boulevard. Inside, you’ll find all you need for doomsday: a variety of military clothing, bullet proof vests, guides on how to survive in the wilderness and how to make booby traps, even large drums for storing water. Broome is a Vietnam veteran, and in his camouflage pants he appears ready for the end of the world.


Last night, Democrat Kay Hagan and Republican Thom Tillis took part in their first live debate. And if you like talking points it didn’t disappoint. Joining us for some analysis of North Carolina’s first US Senate debate of the season is WFAE contributor and Cawtaba College political science professor Michael Bitzer. 

Marshall Terry

This week about 5,000 delegates of the American Legion are in Charlotte for the organization’s national convention.  This year’s gathering is marked by the recent uproar over accusations of mismanagement at the Department of Veterans Affairs and long wait times at VA centers around the country that some of have said led to deaths that could have been prevented.  President Obama will speak at the convention Tuesday.

WFAE went to the convention uptown to speak with the American Legion’s National Commander, Daniel Dellinger.


Republican legislative leaders have suffered some legal setbacks in their efforts to revamp state government. Perhaps most significantly, a judge ruled the state could not take tenure away from teachers.

So, the General Assembly responded by changing the court system. Beginning next month, any constitutional challenge to laws the General Assembly passes will be heard by a 3-judge panel appointed by the chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court.

The proposed sales tax hike in Mecklenburg County gets the endorsement of most school board members, but how the referendum came about runs several of them the wrong way. There's also a new effort to help struggling schools. It's called the Beacon Initiative. Education reporter Lisa Miller fills us in.

Plus, News Director Greg Collard explains why it's misleading for  the National Republican Senatorial Committee to cite this Party Line blog post in arguing that its Democratic counterparts have "hit the panic button" with a $9 million ad buy on behalf of U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan.

WFAE's top utility player, Marshall Terry, fills in for Ben Bradford on this week's episode.

Update 1:10 PM

South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson says insurance fraud complaints in the state have reached a historic high, with more than 1,200 last year. Wilson’s office last year prosecuted cases that resulted in 37 convictions and resulted in more than $700,000 being returned to the victims of insurance fraud. The report notes that in one Darlington County case, three defendants sought payment from a health insurance company claiming they each had all four limbs amputated. None of the defendants had lost their limbs and one was convicted and sent to prison for 18 months. The report notes that since 1995, almost 14,000 insurance fraud complaints have been received by the state Attorney General's office.

Governor Pat McCrory has appointed an acting director of the State Bureau of Investigation. B.W. Collier is a 26-year veteran of the bureau, during which time he has served in a variety of roles, including drug investigator, pilot, and bomb squad commander. He was appointed director of Alcohol Law Enforcement last year.

The state budget signed by Gov. McCrory today transfers the SBI from the Department of Justice to the Department of Public Safety, where it will operate as an independent agency. 

A November referendum to raise Mecklenburg County’s sales tax a quarter of a cent has yet to get support from a big booster:  the Charlotte Chamber.  The Chamber says it’s not against the purpose of the increase:  using the generated money to pay for raises for CMS employees and to help prop up the area’s struggling arts and science centers. Rather, it says more discussion is needed on finding specific funding options. So, the Chamber is staying out of the referendum debate. Mecklenburg County Commissioner Dumont Clarke, a referendum supporter, says a Chamber-funded campaign would have helped pass the sales tax hike, but he remains confident.


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