Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. He divides his time between delivering newscasts during the day at the top of every hour and reporting on everything from hot peppers to a museum dedicated to the theory that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

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Daniel Caton and Lee Hawkins / Appalachian State University

One of the unsolved mysteries of North Carolina is the Brown Mountain Lights. They are unexplained flickers that appear on and around the mountain near Morganton. And those lights have inspired a lot of theories, including aliens being responsible. The lights were even the subject of an X-Files episode.

Brian Gersten

In the days before the internet or phones, one of the ways some people communicated with neighbors in rural areas was hollerin.' It's a form of communication that has become obsolete. For nearly 50 years, though, the tradition was kept alive with the annual National Hollerin' Contest in Sampson County in eastern North Carolina. But now the hollerin' has come to an end. Organizers this summer ended the contest, citing a lack of interest among younger generations. To find out more about the art of hollerin, we reached out to arguably its biggest star, Iris Turner of Fayetteville. Tuner won the Ladies Hollerin' Competition in 1977 and appeared on Johnny Carson and the Gong Show.

Dane Abernathy

If you're a jazz fan, you may like Coltrane or Miles. Or maybe the Dave Brubeck Quartet. There's a sub-genre called free jazz. And it's out there, man. It often has no chord changes and sometimes no apparent structure to the music at all.  It's called 'free jazz' because players are free to play what they want.  And for Charlotte's Brent Bagwell and Seth Nanaa, it's a passion. In between day jobs and raising families, they make up the duo Ghost Trees. They release their own records and tour the country and Europe. And they're putting the South on the map in the free jazz world.

Flickr/Seth Sawyers / http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/4267034867/sizes/l/

CMS board members have long discussed a new student assignment plan, but only in broad terms. Soon, things are going to get specific as they begin coming up with an actual plan. Michael Alves is the consultant who's going to help the board do that, charging $135,000 to do so. 

Rob McKenzie

As the peak summer travel season approaches, Charlotte Aviation Director Brent Cagle is worried about long security lines. He says spring break was a horrible experience for many passengers.

"We had customers who reported waiting in line for up to 3 hours,” Cagle says.  “We also had security check point lines that snaked literally from the second floor ticketing level down into baggage they were so long."

Folger Shakespeare Library

Scholars and fans around the world this year are marking 400 years since the death of the Bard. As part of the anniversary, you can see the earliest-known collection of Shakespeare's plays in Raleigh. The North Carolina Museum of History has on display what's known as the First Folio. Michelle Carr is with the museum. She says the book is what helped to preserve the work of Shakespeare for later generations.

You can see the First Folio on display at the museum through May 30.

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge in Winston-Salem ruled Monday night that North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul is constitutional. The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and others sued over the 2013 law, calling it one of the most restrictive in the nation. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to walk through the decision.

Scott Wishart

Vinyl records fell out of favor beginning in the late 80s and 90s as digital music became king. And by the early 00s, it looked like vinyl’s days were numbered. But a mixture of new artists releasing their music on vinyl and a new generation discovering the format is breathing new life into the medium.

This trend is evident at Charlotte’s very own Lunchbox Records. Business has been so good it’s moved into a space that’s more than twice as big. WFAE’s resident record nerds Sarah Delia and Marshall Terry stopped by as the record store was preparing to open the new spot.

Marshall Terry / WFAE

Sometimes you can judge the legend of someone by how much they are discussed after they die. It’s been 13 years since the death of Nina Simone, who grew up west of Charlotte in Tryon before achieving worldwide fame as the "High Priestess of Soul."

David T Foster III / Charlotte Observer

Today is the primary election in North Carolina. On the ballot are candidates for president as well as governor, U.S. Senate, and N.C. House and N.C. Senate. Some of the presidential candidates were in Charlotte yesterday making their last- minute pitches to voters.  


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