Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication.  He divides his time between delivering newscasts during the day at the top of every hour and reporting on everything from hot peppers to a museum dedicated to the theory that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina.    Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

Charlotte is known for its trees. Its tree canopy covers about 47 percent of the city. Don McSween has been a big part of growing it. For 33 years, he was in charge of maintaining and protecting the canopy as city arborist. He just retired, and on his last day on the job, McSween invited WFAE's Marshall Terry to go with him to one of his favorite tree spots in Charlotte: the line of oaks that hover over Tryon uptown. There we talked about his time as arborist and how he got into the work.

This weekend marks the 150th anniversary of the largest surrender of Confederate troops during the Civil War. It took place near Durham. North Carolina state history and tourism officials have been trying something new to get young people interested in the Civil War and to promote the role North Carolina played.  They’ve set up a Twitter account in the name of a real-life 19th century Lincolnton woman named Mary Chestnut. And to make "Mary’s tweets" about the Civil War more relatable to a modern audience, they’ve added references to today’s pop culture. Jeff Miles is the Department of Culture Resources web content manger and he joins WFAE's Marshall Terry to talk about the Twitter project.

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

Sarah Delia / 90.7 WFAE

Saturday is a sort of national holiday for record collectors:  it’s Record Store Day. First held eight years ago, Record Store Day was created to boost traffic in local record stores with the release of special, limited items. The sorts of things record collectors geek out about, like different colored vinyl or reissues of obscure albums. WFAE’s resident record geeks, Marshall Terry and Sarah Delia stopped by Lunchbox Records in Charlotte to see how it’s preparing for the big day.

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

Next month, a landmark of Charlotte’s Dilworth neighborhood is closing its doors after 35 years: Dilworth Billiards. Owner Eric Sprouse says when he opened in the late 70s, pool halls had a bad reputation.

“People equated them to a rough place, a hangout of misfits,” says Sprouse.

Sprouse wanted something different.  His pool hall stood out in the area just off South Boulevard bordering what is now South End – a part of town that could be rough. Dilworth Billiards was an upscale place to play, a place where you could bring a date. A place to meet your friends for a drink after work. Sprouse says the time is right to close. He just turned 65 and wants to retire.

He recently told us about the history of Dilworth Billiards and showed us some of his antique pool tables over a game of nine ball. The pool hall started as just a showroom for Sprouse’s side pool-table business while he worked full time in insurance.

Dominick D - Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons -

John Mulaney is a rising young star in the comedy world.  The former Saturday Night Live writer recently created and starred in his own sitcom.  He’s now returned to touring the country doing standup and comes to Charlotte’s Knight Theater on Saturday.  He spoke to Morning Edition host Marshall Terry from the road.

Hospitals in the Charlotte region are taking extra precautions against a deadly superbug called CRE. That's after a recent outbreak at a UCLA hospital. The infection is difficult to treat, but it's extremely rare for healthy people to get it inside or outside of hospitals.

Wednesday night, Governor Pat McCrory laid out his political priorities in the State of the State Address.  Michael Bitzer is a political scientist with Catawba College.  He joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry for his take on the speech.

Mavis Staples of the legendary Staple Singers got her start as a teenager in the 50s in her family’s band.  In the 60s, the Staple Singers, led the by the patriarch Roebuck “Pops” Staples, become well-known as a voice of the Civil Rights movement.  Mavis Staples is performing at Wingate University this evening.  Morning Edition host Marshall Terry caught up with her before the show, and asked her about her memories of the Civil Rights era.

Marshall Terry / 90.7 WFAE

In 1961, 10 African-Americans were convicted of trespassing and breach of the peace for refusing to leave a McCrory’s store all-white lunch counter in downtown Rock Hill, South Carolina. The men were given two options at sentencing: serve 30 days in jail, or pay a $100 dollar fine.  Nine of the 10 chose jail and received 30 days of hard labor at the York County Prison farm. It was the beginning of the “Jail, No Bail” strategy of the Civil Rights Movement. That group of nine is known as the Friendship Nine, named for the junior college many of them attended.

Their convictions are still on the books. That will change today.

York County’s Solicitor Kevin Brackett will tell a judge the convictions should be cleared. WFAE's Marshall Terry spoke to him outside the courtroom where today’s hearing will take place.