Marshall Terry

Morning Edition Host

Marshall came to WFAE after graduating from Appalachian State University, where he worked at the campus radio station and earned a degree in communication. He divides his time between delivering newscasts during the day at the top of every hour and reporting on everything from hot peppers to a museum dedicated to the theory that Abraham Lincoln was born in North Carolina. Outside of radio, he loves listening to music and going to see bands - preferably in small, dingy clubs.

Ways to Connect

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Courtesy of Lawana Mayfield

Charlotte City Council did not bite Monday night on state legislative leaders' offer over House Bill 2. State lawmakers said  if council rescinded protections for LGBT people passed early this year, the General Assembly would repeal the bill.  

"It wasn't an offer it was a demand and bullying," says council member Lawana Mayfield. "We teach our children that bullying is wrong, but yet as adults and as political figures to use bullying sends a very mixed message across the state and across the nation."  

She spoke with WFAE's Marshall Terry Tuesday morning.  

Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC

Political leaders, economic leaders – really, anyone with an opinion on House Bill 2 – will be paying close attention to Charlotte City Council Monday night to see if it will rescind its expansion to the city’s non-discrimination ordinance. 

House Bill 2 was back in the news this week - with decisions by both the NCAA and ACC to pull championship games from the state because of the law. We start this week's discussion looking at the potential impact of those decisions on the election. Then we look at the lieutenant governor's race.

WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College joins WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Michael Bitzer

This week, we focus on the race for U.S. Senate in North Carolina. Ads in the race began airing this week.  Incumbent Republican Richard Burr is seen as vulnerable in what is a close race. Democrats have made taking back the Senate a priority. WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College discusses the race.

The state Fraternal Order of Police is still upset that the office of Attorney General Roy Cooper prosecuted former CMPD officer Randall Kerrick last summer in the shooting death of Jonathan Ferrell. FOP members walked out on Cooper, the Democratic candidate for governor, as he was speaking at the group's annual conference. The group also endorsed incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory.

WFAE political analyst Michael Bitzer of Catawba College discusses the FOP's actions, early voting hours, and voter registration demographics in this week's election roundup.

The general election is a little less than 90 days away after, well, some would argue this election season started four years ago. Perhaps our next guest would agree. He’s political science professor Michael Bitzer of Catawba College, and also WFAE’s political analyst. We’ll talk to him every Friday through the general election. He spoke to WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Daniel Caton and Lee Hawkins / Appalachian State University

One of the unsolved mysteries of North Carolina is the Brown Mountain Lights. They are unexplained flickers that appear on and around the mountain near Morganton. And those lights have inspired a lot of theories, including aliens being responsible. The lights were even the subject of an X-Files episode.

Brian Gersten

In the days before the internet or phones, one of the ways some people communicated with neighbors in rural areas was hollerin.' It's a form of communication that has become obsolete. For nearly 50 years, though, the tradition was kept alive with the annual National Hollerin' Contest in Sampson County in eastern North Carolina. But now the hollerin' has come to an end. Organizers this summer ended the contest, citing a lack of interest among younger generations. To find out more about the art of hollerin, we reached out to arguably its biggest star, Iris Turner of Fayetteville. Tuner won the Ladies Hollerin' Competition in 1977 and appeared on Johnny Carson and the Gong Show.

Dane Abernathy

If you're a jazz fan, you may like Coltrane or Miles. Or maybe the Dave Brubeck Quartet. There's a sub-genre called free jazz. And it's out there, man. It often has no chord changes and sometimes no apparent structure to the music at all.  It's called 'free jazz' because players are free to play what they want.  And for Charlotte's Brent Bagwell and Seth Nanaa, it's a passion. In between day jobs and raising families, they make up the duo Ghost Trees. They release their own records and tour the country and Europe. And they're putting the South on the map in the free jazz world.