Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect

Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

A Muslim woman from Charlotte is still making national headlines, days after she was escorted from a Donald Trump rally in Rock Hill, SC. Rose Hamid stood up in a “silent protest” during a Friday night speech by the Republican presidential candidate in the Winthrop Coliseum.  Hamid was wearing the Muslim head-scarf known as a hijab.  She spoke Monday with WFAE’s Mark Rumsey.


NC.gov

The North Carolina Board of Education got some notice this week for something it didn’t do. The board decided to delay forwarding a report on charter schools to state lawmakers. WFAE’s Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey in the studio to discuss.

Jennifer Lang

The calendar says “January” but some trees and shrubs in the Charlotte area have been saying “March” in recent weeks. The unseasonably-warm December sent some plants into flowering mode. So, what will this mean when March really does roll around?  WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with Dr. Jeff Gillman, director of the botanical gardens at UNC Charlotte.


Ben Bradford / WFAE

Draft recommendations from North Carolina regulators would require Duke Energy to eventually remove coal ash from two-thirds of the company’s ash ponds at power plants across the state. That’s about the same number of sites that Duke has already said it’s targeting for ash removal. 

Steve Hillebrand / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

As 2015 comes to a close, uncertainty remains about the fate of a federal program in North Carolina aimed at protecting the Red Wolf from extinction. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has repeatedly delayed a decision on whether to continue or abandon the Red Wolf Recovery program that was started in 1987. WFAE’s Mark Rumsey has a recap of this year’s developments:

The recently-named CEO of a planned mental health care program in Charlotte has resigned, after about one month on the job. The HopeWay Foundation says Daniel Brown stepped down December 10 to return to his previous employer, Albemarle-based behavioral health care provider Monarch. 

In a statement, Brown cited “family considerations” for his decision. HopeWay co-founder Bill Blue says the organization is resuming its search for a CEO.    

Mark Rumsey

In the Charlotte region, the words airport and Charlotte Douglas International, usually go together. It might surprise you to know that North Carolina’s 5th-busiest airport is located just about 20 miles away – in Concord. Before Charlotte hosted the Democratic National Convention in 2012, the City of Concord promoted Concord Regional Airport as the “fastest gateway to Charlotte” for  private and charter flights bringing convention attendees to town.

Over the past two years, Concord’s airport has been carving out a new niche in the Charlotte region’s air travel business. 

Scott*/Flickr

A federal lawsuit involving a transgender high school student in Virginia is leading to heated political rhetoric in North Carolina.

Republican Governor Pat McCrory is criticizing state Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat, for not getting involved in the case. And North Carolina Senate leader Phil Berger put out a statement Tuesday that makes it seem like Cooper is in favor of "forcing middle school-aged boys and girls to use the same locker room."

Richland County District 2

The school officer seen grabbing a South Carolina high school student in a video has been fired. Deputy Ben Fields is no longer an employee of the Richland County Sherriff’s office in Columbia said Sheriff Leon Lott Wednesday. 

http://1.usa.gov/1PNZd0E / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It’s been nearly 70 years since a species of fish called the Lake Sturgeon has been found in North Carolina waters. Experts say it’s a fish with a long history.  

“The lake sturgeon is a very ancient breed of fish,” says Stephen Jackson, a hatchery manager with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in eastern North Carolina. “They were around during the dinosaurs and actually predate many of the dinosaurs that we’re very familiar with.” 

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