Mark Rumsey

Community Engagement Coordinator/All Things Considered Host

Mark Rumsey grew up in Kansas and got his first radio job at age 17 in the town of Abilene, where he announced easy-listening music played from vinyl record albums.   

Later stops in his radio career found him reporting and anchoring local news at stations in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Charlotte.

Mark joined the world of public radio in 1997 as News Director at WFAE.  Today, he continues to serve as local host for All Things Considered and produces WFAE’s Public Conversations, an ongoing series of community forums.  

If Mark turns up missing on a nice autumn day, you might find him on the hiking trails at North Carolina’s Stone Mountain State Park.   If he disappears for a week or two – check  the Tel Aviv airport.  Perhaps he’s found a way to again pursue his passion for traveling to the Holy Land.

Ways to Connect


A federal lawsuit involving a transgender high school student in Virginia is leading to heated political rhetoric in North Carolina.

Republican Governor Pat McCrory is criticizing state Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat, for not getting involved in the case. And North Carolina Senate leader Phil Berger put out a statement Tuesday that makes it seem like Cooper is in favor of "forcing middle school-aged boys and girls to use the same locker room."

Richland County District 2

The school officer seen grabbing a South Carolina high school student in a video has been fired. Deputy Ben Fields is no longer an employee of the Richland County Sherriff’s office in Columbia said Sheriff Leon Lott Wednesday. / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It’s been nearly 70 years since a species of fish called the Lake Sturgeon has been found in North Carolina waters. Experts say it’s a fish with a long history.  

“The lake sturgeon is a very ancient breed of fish,” says Stephen Jackson, a hatchery manager with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in eastern North Carolina. “They were around during the dinosaurs and actually predate many of the dinosaurs that we’re very familiar with.” 

NC General Assembly

A number of controversial bills are before the North Carolina House today. They include stripping some key powers from municipalities and making school districts give more to charter schools. The House will reconvene at 7 o’clock Tuesday night. Joining All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey to catch us up on what’s happened so far are WFAE’s Tom Bullock and Lisa Worf. 

Julie Rose

North Carolina legislators are debating the future of state funding for light rail projects.  The recently-passed budget includes a $500,000 cap on state money for light rail projects.

Courtesy: Bank of America

Bank of America shareholders will vote Tuesday on whether chief executive Brian Moynihan should continue to also serve as the company’s chairman.   The issue has been brewing for several years. 

Shareholders voted back in 2009 to separate the CEO and chairman roles.   But in a controversial move last year, the Bank of America board changed the company’s by-laws to allow one person to hold both titles.   

The number of people who choose hospice care in the U.S. has grown steadily in recent years.  But researchers have also noticed that among African-Americans, the use of hospice is disproportionately smaller. Recent federal statistics show that  while 47 percent of white Medicare recipients approaching end of life enrolled in a hospice program, only 35 percent of African-Americans did so. The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization reports that in 2013, 8.4 percent of U.S. hospice patients were black.  

WFAE has been exploring end-of-life care this year. To continue the conversation, Mark Rumsey spoke with Duke University Geriatric Medicine Specialist and professor, Dr. Kimberly Johnson. She has studied the use of hospice care by  older African-Americans.

The number of CMS students who are taking Advanced Placement courses and exams continues to increase.  

  •  8,492 CMS students enrolled in at last one AP course in 2014-2015 school year
  • AP course enrollment by African-American students rose 12.2 percent; Hispanic enrollment was up 16 percent
  • CMS pass rate on 2015 AP exams was 49.6 percent, compared to national rate of 60.5 percent

The first Belk store opened in Monroe in 1888. The Belk family and the company played a large role in the development of Charlotte. Tom Hanchett, staff historian at the Levine Museum of the New South, spoke to WFAE All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey about some of that history.

Among Hanchett's comments:

- The  Belk family helped build a non-profit infrastructure in the South, similar to what wealthy industrialists such as the Carnegies did in the Northeast.

One of the Charlotte area's largest companies, Lowe's, is growing its profits but not as much as analysts want.

The home improvement giant reported a profit of more than $1.1 billion for its most recent fiscal quarter. That's an 8 percent increase over the same period (May through July) a year ago.

Lowe's CEO called the results "solid," and highlighted particularly strong growth in appliances and outdoor power equipment.