Duncan McFadyen

Weekend Edition Saturday Host/Reporter

Duncan is a native North Carolinian, born and raised in Wilmington. A lifelong musician, he got his start in broadcasting as a volunteer classical music host at his hometown public radio station, WHQR. He went on to host “Morning Edition” there, and then at WCQS in Asheville.

He enjoys live music, hiking, playing the piano, Scotch whisky, and craft beer.

Duncan is an alumnus of  the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by way of Duke University .

 

Ways to Connect

Denise Cross Photography

The League of Women Voters, the North Carolina NAACP and others are appealing a federal ruling that upheld North Carolina's 2013 voting overhaul. At the heart of the case is this question: does the law disenfranchise African-Americans? WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Duncan McFadyen to discuss how the federal judge addressed that question in his ruling this week.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory released more details Friday morning from his budget plan for the 2016-17 fiscal year that starts July 1. 


Tasnim Shamma / WFAE

Two years ago, former Mayor Patrick Cannon confessed to accepting bribes. Now, you can see him commit the crimes.

The FBI on Wednesday released portions of audio and video recordings of former Charlotte mayor Patrick Cannon accepting cash bribes from undercover agents. The agents posed as developers looking to build a large project in Charlotte. Cannon promised to help them get a property’s zoning changed in exchange for more than $48,000 in cash and gifts.

CPCC

Central Piedmont Community College is developing a new program to train people to develop anti-counterfeit printing.


WRAL

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper on Tuesday said his office won’t defend North Carolina's House Bill 2, the controversial legislation approved by state lawmakers and signed by Governor Pat McCrory in a single day last week. During a news conference in Raleigh, carried by WRAL-TV, Cooper added that the law is in “direct conflict” with existing non-discrimination policies on hiring in his office and the state treasurer’s office.  


Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The North Carolina legislature’s response to Charlotte’s expanded non-discrimination ordinance, House Bill 2, is a broad measure that addresses more than just the much debated "bathroom" provision. And now there’s a lot of confusion about certain aspects of the bill.


NC Legislature

Update 7:30 a.m.

It took just 12 hours for a bill striking down Charlotte’s recent expansion of its non-discrimination ordinance to include LGBT individuals to become law. But the measure does much more than that. It also includes significant limitations in the power of local governments across the state.

Updated 11:15 p.m.

Governor McCrory has signed legislation that overturns an update to Charlotte's non-discrimination ordinance and restricts the authority of local governments throughout the state in other matters, such as the ability to approve a minimum wage higher than the federal standard.

twitter.com/CLTMayor

Charlotte’s newly expanded non-discrimination ordinance is on the minds of Republican leaders in the General Assembly and of Governor McCrory. They appear intent on overturning the most controversial part of the ordinance that allows transgender people to use the bathroom of the gender they identify with. Speaker Moore says he’s prepared to call a special session of the legislature to address the  ordinance before it takes effect April 1, 2016.

Charlotte's Mayor Jennifer Roberts shares  her thoughts on the reaction to the expansion of the ordinance. 


CPCC

Central Piedmont Community College will have a new president for the first time in more than two decades. Tony Zeiss, who led the college through a period of significant growth, announced his retirement yesterday.


Duncan McFadyen

New air traffic control technology at Charlotte Douglas International Airport should help reduce the time spent on planes, if all goes according to plan.

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