NPR News

Many people have experienced the magic of a wonderful teacher, and we all know anecdotally that these instructors can change our lives. But what if a teacher and a student don't connect? How does that affect the education that child receives?

Is there a way to create a connection where there isn't one? And how might that change things, for teachers and students alike?

On Monday, 15 supporters of the Confederate battle flag were indicted on terrorism charges in Douglas County, a suburb of Atlanta.

The 15 accused are charged with making terroristic threats and violating an anti-street gang ordinance during a July 25 incident in which a group of white men in Confederate and American flag-adorned pickup trucks clashed with a group of black people attending an outdoor party.

Hungary Steps Up Arrest And Deportation Of Migrants

11 hours ago

On a road weaving through a forest on Hungary's southern border with Serbia, police lie in wait.

Migrants who manage to squeeze through holes cut in a barbed-wire border fence and walk north eventually have to cross Route 55 — where Hungarian police are ready for them.

Backed by agents from Frontex, the European Union's border control agency, the cops stop dozens of migrants and refugees as they emerge from the forest. They point guns and shine bright lights into the faces of frightened Iraqis and Syrians.

On Sunday night, the New York Giants celebrated a thrilling 30-27 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

But one player wasn't there to join in the jubilation.

Big food companies are buying up small ones. Honest Tea is now part of Coca-Cola. The French company Danone controls Stonyfield yogurt. Hormel owns Applegate natural and organic meats.

A debate over academic freedom of speech was ignited in summer 2014 when the University of Illinois rescinded a job offer to a professor over a controversial set of tweets about the Israel-Gaza conflict. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with the professor, Steven Salaita, about his experience.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Schools tend to be the center of the community in small towns across America. That's probably never been more the case for Middletown, Calif., than right now.

Last month, when a wildfire destroyed more than half of the town in the mountains north of San Francisco, the schools were miraculously spared. They've since reopened and are offering a respite from the sad, day-to-day struggles many students and staff are facing.

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews Sonia Nazario — author of Enrique's Journey and board member of the group Kind — about her New York Times story on Mexico's campaign to keep Central American migrants from the U.S. border.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit